Museum of Modern Art Picks 3 Design Finalists

By Newmark, Judith | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 13, 1997 | Go to article overview

Museum of Modern Art Picks 3 Design Finalists


Newmark, Judith, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


NEW YORK'S Museum of Modern Art, principal repository of late 19th- and 20th-century art in the United States, announced Thursday the selection of three architectural firms to compete for a final design for the museum's ambitious expansion-renovation project in midtown Manhattan.

The firms that were chosen as finalists: Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron, Basel, Switzerland; Yoshio Taniguchi, Tokyo; and Bernard Tschumi, New York.

Board chairman emeritus David Rockefeller said the potential is for the Modern to "create a bold and innovative building which will symbolize the museum's leadership role in the art of the 21st century." The museum was founded in 1929. For most all of its life it has been housed in ever-growing quarters on West 53rd Street in midtown Manhattan. The expanded building will rise on land formerly occupied by the old Dorset Hotel and two brownstone houses facing 54th Street. In 1995, an exhibition of photographs by Thomas Ruff of the work of Herzog and de Meuron was shown in St. Louis at the Forum for Contemporary Art. - Robert W. Duffy - The New Theatre, that company of thespian nomads, will present its final production of the season, "Love! …

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