Defense Industry Retains Strength, Says Weidenbaum

By William Flannery Of The Post-Dispatch | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 16, 1997 | Go to article overview

Defense Industry Retains Strength, Says Weidenbaum


William Flannery Of The Post-Dispatch, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


America's defense industries have weathered the end of the Cold War, while retaining a strong military industrial base, concludes a new study by conservative economist Murray Weidenbaum.

"The U.S. defense industry is adjusting . . . far more rapidly and far more effectively than was generally expected," Weidenbaum writes in his new report "The U.S. Defense Industry After the Cold War."

While the transition has been painful, Weidenbaum said, "Nevertheless, today's national security decision-makers can count on the presence of a strong defense industrial base." But Weidenbaum cautions that problems remain, particularly the low funding of military research and development. He also argues, "Soft and marginal areas of (defense) spending must be eliminated - no matter the political cost - if any new expansions in military capability are to be seriously considered." Weidenbaum is chairman of the Center for the Study of American Business at Washington University. Weidenbaum credits the transformation to a hardheaded approach by defense executives to merge or sell off defense units "that were viable but not industry leaders." "General Dynamics sold its space systems to Martin and its tactical aircraft business to Lockheed. General Motors' Hughes subsidiary is selling its defense electronics activity to Raytheon, which has acquired Texas Instruments' defense unit," Weidenbaum said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Defense Industry Retains Strength, Says Weidenbaum
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.