Pop on the Rocks

By Chris Dickinson Post-Dispatch Pop Music Critic | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), May 1, 1997 | Go to article overview

Pop on the Rocks


Chris Dickinson Post-Dispatch Pop Music Critic, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Lots of writers spend years trying to get their work in front of the public. For Ann Lesley Hamvas, a 17-year-old junior at Ladue's Horton Watkins High School, that process has been made just a tad easier through the massive distribution arm of Capitol Records.

Her poem, "The River of Eternity," was one of eight works by high school artists and writers nationwide to be selected for inclusion in the CD booklet for the new Richard Marx release, "Flesh and Bone." The booklet's intent is to showcase the importance of the arts in the lives of America's schoolchildren.

Marx, a smooth pop singer with a raft of past hits under his belt, is also a leading proponent of the National Endowment for the Arts. He's already been to Capitol Hill to discuss the future of arts funding in schools nationwide. Marx isn't shy when it comes to expressing his distress over NEA budget cuts. "The more I found out about how wonderful the NEA is, the more angry I got about the legs being cut out from under it," he explains. Marx, 33, says he doesn't approach the debate from the standpoint of a performer, but as a father (he has three sons, ages 6, 4 and 3) and a citizen. He sees the arts as a necessary component in the development of the youth of America. "I'm tired of seeing a generation of teen-agers without a focus, without a passion," he says. "My complete fascination with music kept me on a path. I had something to be crazy about. So many kids don't have that now. I don't care if it's sports, science, arts, whatever. The bigger issue is to get kids interested." Marx says he's not necessarily interested in inspiring kids to pursue a career in the arts. He just believes an early appreciation makes for a well-rounded person. "Kids with exposure to arts score higher on SATs than kids that don't," he says with the conviction of a proselytizing parent. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pop on the Rocks
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.