Growth Industry: Moving Inmates over Road but Enforcement Officials Worry about Escapes, Public Safety and Drivers' Training

By 1997, Knight-Ridder Newspapers Teresa Owen-Cooper | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), September 15, 1997 | Go to article overview

Growth Industry: Moving Inmates over Road but Enforcement Officials Worry about Escapes, Public Safety and Drivers' Training


1997, Knight-Ridder Newspapers Teresa Owen-Cooper, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


A COLLECTION OF murderers, car thieves, bank robbers and rapists cruises through Colorado Springs on Interstate 25, air conditioning on high and the radio playing.

The van they are in stops at a fast-food restaurant, but they are not on a crime rampage. Under guard, they are simply getting dinner and taking a bathroom break.

One by one, they exit from a steel-mesh cage bolted inside the van. Each is wearing leg irons, waist chains and handcuffs. Welcome to the world of prisoner transportation. It's a booming business across the country, as more state and county jailers try to rein in the cost of transporting inmates. Every day, unmarked vans with tinted windows, two-way radios and cellular phones trek across the country on highways through major cities. Most of the transports are made successfully. But not always. Traffic crashes have killed guards and inmates when exhausted drivers pushed themselves too far. And escapes have occurred when vans broke down or guards fell asleep on duty. In July, Dennis Patrick Glick, a convicted rapist and kidnapper, escaped from a private transport company van in southeastern Colorado. Because of that escape, Colorado sheriffs are pushing for new state laws to mandate basic safety and training requirements for private companies doing business in the state. Currently, no such guidelines exist. "We need to do something," said Pueblo County Sheriff Dan Corsentino, chairman of the Colorado County Sheriff's Association. Glick was being driven by Federal Extradition Agency Inc. from a jail in Salt Lake City to Pine Bluffs, Ark. The company is based in Memphis, Tenn. When the van stopped at the Crowley County Jail in Ordway, Colo., 90 miles southeast of Colorado Springs, Glick saw his chance to flee. While still in the van, Glick allegedly grabbed a gun from a guard who had fallen asleep. Glick then improvised. First he made hostages out of the guard and seven other inmates in the van. His next victim was a rancher who was forced to travel with him. He allegedly stole two vehicles and a horse before leading about 60 law enforcement officials on an all-night chase across the Colorado prairie. He was recaptured the next morning while riding the stolen horse, waving a gun in one hand. Remarkably, no one was hurt in the episode. Authorities agree that Glick's case was unusual, but it shows the potential danger that exists when vans of dangerous criminals are cruising the highways with other travelers. Thousands of inmates are being transported on highways every day, said Jim Cure, founder of Extraditions International Inc. in Denver. It happens all the time, and most of it is done safely. Extraditions International, for example, makes about 400 transports a month. Some inmates have been arrested on a warrant in another city. Others need to be moved from a jail in one state to a less-crowded institution elsewhere. Sometimes, inmates are moved after they've been victimized in a jail. TransCor America Inc., in Nashville, Tenn., is considered to be the largest inmate transport company in the country. Its 250 employees use about 100 vans to haul 40,000 prisoners a year. Federal Extradition Agency Inc. is another major company. Its director, Mark Burgan, declined comment on his business and referred questions to the company's attorney, Matt Heider, who did not return calls.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Growth Industry: Moving Inmates over Road but Enforcement Officials Worry about Escapes, Public Safety and Drivers' Training
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.