Chamorro Keeps Support for Salvadoran Rebels CONCESSION TO GUERRILLAS

By Brook Larmer, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 2, 1990 | Go to article overview

Chamorro Keeps Support for Salvadoran Rebels CONCESSION TO GUERRILLAS


Brook Larmer, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


IN an apparent rebuff to the United States, the government of Violeta Barrios de Chamorro has agreed to let leftist rebels of neighboring El Salvador keep offices open here for political activity, according to a leader of the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front.

Salvador Samayoa, leading spokesman for the Marxist-inspired guerrilla coalition, says the decision came after a series of meetings between FMLN representatives and the two top advisers of Mrs. Chamorro's government, Antonio Lacayo, minister of the presidency, and Alfredo Cesar, ex-contra director.

"Our activity will be more discreet (than before) but it won't be secret," says Mr. Samayoa, noting that the Chamorro's government wants to play a role in resolving other civil wars in the region. "All the logistical and military support...that we were said to receive will not be acceptable even by the "softer" members of the new government. But we'll still be able to do political work."

For the past decade, the FMLN has turned its close relationship with the Sandinista comandantes into a logistical base that serves a variety of purposes: for rest and relaxation, for medical attention to wounded fighters, for high-level consultations, for transmissions of Radio Venceremos, for training with new weapons and artillery, and even - as the US has constantly charged - for arranging shipments of arms to El Salvador.

The US government, concerned with stopping Nicaraguan support for the FMLN, has justified supporting contras by saying they were preventing Nicaragua from exporting revolution.

With unusual frankness, Samayoa acknowledged that the FMLN often arranged arms shipments through Nicaragua. He even said the rebels, with Sandinista cooperation, arranged the mysterious planeload of SAM-7 anti-aircraft missiles that took off in Nicaragua and crashed in a Salvadoran field in November.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Chamorro Keeps Support for Salvadoran Rebels CONCESSION TO GUERRILLAS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.