Peru Balks at US Military-Aid Offer

By Mark R. Day, | The Christian Science Monitor, May 3, 1990 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Peru Balks at US Military-Aid Offer


Mark R. Day,, The Christian Science Monitor


A PLAN to send United States military advisers and weapons to bolster the Peruvian Army against cocaine traffickers and their Maoist guerrilla protectors has drawn sharp criticism from human rights activists and political leaders here.

Under the plan, the Peruvian Defense Ministry would get $35 million in US military aid this year, and the same amount in 1991. The aid would train and equip six Peruvian Army and Marine battalions in counterinsurgency tactics in Peru's Upper Huallaga Valley.

But the politically sensitive plan, set to be signed last week, was dealt a setback when Peruvian President Alan Garcia Perez suddenly announced April 25 that he would not endorse it.

"The war on drugs cannot be waged with military force alone," President Garcia said. "I will not sign any agreement if it does not include economic aid" for crop substitution and debt relief.

Garcia, however, leaves office July 28. A runoff presidential election is scheduled for early June between Alberto Fujimori and Mario Vargas Llosa. Both candidates have said they would accept US military advisers in Peru, though neither has specifically endorsed the aid plan.

Other Peruvian politicians say the presence of US special forces will infringe on their national sovereignty. "What we need in this country are greenbacks, not Green Berets," says Congressman Hector Vargas Haya, a member of Peru's American Popular Revolutionary Alliance (APRA).

At the heart of the problem is the Huallaga valley, which produces half of the world's coca leaves. The valley is a hotbed of violence by guerrilla groups, drug traffickers, paramilitary groups, and government forces.

In addition to the Maoist Sendero Luminoso (Shining Path) guerrillas, a second Marxist guerrilla group, the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement, also operates there. So does the Comando Rodrigo Franco, a right-wing death squad with alleged ties to the APRA.

Rights activists charge that given the valley's level of violence, a military aid pact would violate US foreign aid laws. "United States law says no arms can be sent to countries which systematically violate human rights," says Rudolf Wedel, a spokesman for the Lima-based Association for Human Rights. "Even the US State Department has shown documented proof that this is the case in Peru."

The State Department released its own report on Peruvian human rights in February. That report attributed more than 500 forced disappearances to government security forces in 1989, making Peru the nation with the most disappearances worldwide, a position it has occupied since 1987. The United Nations reported that 404 people disappeared in Peru last year.

Officials say 17,000 people have been killed since the Shining Path began its insurgency a decade ago. The US State Department report attributes assassinations, massacres, and terrorist attacks to the Shining Path guerrillas, but also blames Peruvian military and police forces.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Peru Balks at US Military-Aid Offer
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.