Nicaraguan Strike Taints Both Sides

By Jennifer Bingham Hull, Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, July 13, 1990 | Go to article overview

Nicaraguan Strike Taints Both Sides


Jennifer Bingham Hull, Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


NICARAGUAN President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro and Sandinista party leader Daniel Ortega Saavedra both appear to have lost popular support as a result of the nationwide strike that brought violence to Nicaragua's capital earlier this week.

"The only winners in this are the extremists on both sides," notes Nicaraguan economist and sociologist Oscar Rene Vargas. By yesterday morning, street confrontation and violence had calmed with Mrs. Chamorro and Mr. Ortega reported closer to a settlement.

But observers here say Chamorro's failure to restore order soon after the strike began and public criticism of her handling of outspoken Vice President Virgilio Godoy badly damaged her authority and will likely make it more difficult for her to rule in the future.

"The credibility of the government has suffered a serious blow this week," says one Latin American diplomat based here.

In an address to the nation in the midst of the crisis Monday night, Chamorro declared that police would restore order. By late Wednesday the police and Army had cleared street barricades. But strikers' remained in control of government offices, transport, and the nation's communication system.

"Everyone waited for Violeta to use the police to take control of the situation. But she didn't do anything," says Managua resident David Serrano. "So people decided to take things into their own hands."

Across the city, government supporters organized to dismantle street barricades put up by Sandinista militants, criticizing what they saw as inaction and conflicting loyalties by Sandinista-trained police and Army.

"The police and the Army have protected the strikers," says Horacio Cuadra, the owner of a small electronics repair shop in the Managua neighborhood of Cuidad Jardin. "And Violeta has been very weak."

Whether President Chamorro was unable or unwilling to use the nations armed forces to dislodge the strikers is not clear. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Nicaraguan Strike Taints Both Sides
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.