Kid, You're on Your Own the Transition from School to Work

By Gerald Whitburn. Gerald Whitburn is Wisconsin's Labor Secretary and was recently appointed Us Labor Secretary Elizabeth Dole to a national commission to define basic skill needs 21st century. | The Christian Science Monitor, August 3, 1990 | Go to article overview

Kid, You're on Your Own the Transition from School to Work


Gerald Whitburn. Gerald Whitburn is Wisconsin's Labor Secretary and was recently appointed Us Labor Secretary Elizabeth Dole to a national commission to define basic skill needs 21st century., The Christian Science Monitor


FOR many of the million-plus who have just graduated from high school and who will not be going on to college, the weeks ahead "will be like stepping into a black hole," as Business Week writer John Hoerr put it.

"Most of them face a period of prolonged unemployment or low-paying, part-time jobs," said Hoerr. "The reason: There is no link between school and work in the United States."

Here in the US we haven't learned about "transitioning." We are the only industrial nation that lacks a conscious national policy to move non-college-bound youth from school to work.

Many of our kids travel, hang out, or otherwise poke at the edges of a career after high school, rather than jumping squarely into a decent position with a future. But the Unfortunate fact is that many simply lack the skills needed to perform effectively in today's change-prone workplace.

The vitality of our work force and, therefore, our economy depends on changing this pattern. We must develop and implement improved systems of delivering skills training to future workers; then channel them from schools to stable, well-paying jobs. Here's why.

Each week brings us closer to labor shortages across America. Growth of the nation's work force is at a 50-year low. That force grew at a rate of almost 3 percent a year in the 1970s. But this decade will see annual growth of just 1 percent per year.

New opportunities will open for women who have not yet joined the work force and for minorities, the disabled, and disadvantaged. But in most cases employers will have fewer applicants to choose from and, in many cases, much greater difficulty in attracting employees with job-ready skills.

Here in Wisconsin, about 40 percent of high-school students who will graduate next spring - some 26,000 - will go on to post-secondary education. The other 28,000 graduates will head directly into the labor market. As state school superintendent Herbert Grover stresses, most will "seek employment without specific job skills."

A national study a number of years ago found that nearly 20 percent of the nation's schools employed no counselors to assist non-college-bound students, and another 23 percent had only one counselor with this assignment. …

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