The Heavy-Metal Image Doesn't Fit Iron Maiden Vocalist Bruce Dickinson Challenges the Stereotypes with His First Solo Album MUSIC INTERVIEW

By Amy Duncan, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, August 2, 1990 | Go to article overview

The Heavy-Metal Image Doesn't Fit Iron Maiden Vocalist Bruce Dickinson Challenges the Stereotypes with His First Solo Album MUSIC INTERVIEW


Amy Duncan, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


SOME people hear the words "heavy metal" and instantly conjure up aural and visual images of deafening guitars and drums, unbridled voices screeching incomprehensible or reprehensible lyrics (or both). And the perpetrators of this chaos are, of course, undisciplined youths (often nasty little satanists), with no sense of propriety or decency, let alone personal hygiene!

Okay, so metal has a bad name; there definitely have been some bands that more or less fit the above description. But the world of heavy-metal music has its good guys, too.

Enter Bruce Dickinson, vocalist for the classic British metal band Iron Maiden. Dickinson recently recorded his first solo album, "Tattooed Millionaire" (Columbia) and was on hand to talk a few days after a performance at the Ritz, a massive rock emporium here.

In addition to being a singer and songwriter, Dickinson is also a world-class fencer, a graduate of London University with a degree in history, the writer of a successful first novel, published in Britain, and a collector of time-tables from around the world. Concerning the latter, Dickinson explains, "Whenever I was on the road with Iron Maiden ... on days off everybody would end up in a Holiday Inn in the middle of shopping-mall wasteland. So I developed this fetish for accumulating travel information from all points of the globe so that wherever I was, when we had a day off, I'd say, `I'm outta here."' Dickinson would vanish, and turn up in time for the next gig.

With his long, unruly hair and a fiendish twinkle in his eye, Dickinson looks like the stereotypical bad boy - part of the metal image, to be sure. But he's also dead serious about his music and about changing the poor image heavy metal has, especially in the United States.

Remembering a conversation with the members of the band on his new album, he says, "...Metal music now - isn't it just another bunch of people with big hair and makeup spouting all these empty sentiments, negative stuff? ... When I was listening to bands like Free and Led Zeppelin and Purple at the beginning of the '70s, I felt kind of uplifted and constructive; I thought their music was full of emotion and passion. Where has it gone?"

The harder-edged so-called "thrash" metal and punk music aren't among Dickinson's favorites.

"The problem I have with the thrash-metal stuff is the absence of definable songs," he says. "You can only go so far on energy. It's like having a very fast car that won't go around corners. I found that (punk music) was all anger.... It had loads and loads of energy, but it didn't go anywhere, and it kind of strangled itself. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Heavy-Metal Image Doesn't Fit Iron Maiden Vocalist Bruce Dickinson Challenges the Stereotypes with His First Solo Album MUSIC INTERVIEW
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.