US-Israeli Tensions Rise over Jerusalem Incidents Israel Considers Jerusalem Its Eternal, Undivided Capital. Conflict over That View Has Fueled Resentment against Washington

By Paul Adams, | The Christian Science Monitor, October 19, 1990 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

US-Israeli Tensions Rise over Jerusalem Incidents Israel Considers Jerusalem Its Eternal, Undivided Capital. Conflict over That View Has Fueled Resentment against Washington


Paul Adams,, The Christian Science Monitor


IN 10 tumultuous days, the divided city of Jerusalem has provided a troubled backdrop to a deterioration in United States-Israeli relations and a British diplomatic fiasco.

In the tense, bitter aftermath of the Oct. 8 killing of at least 20 Palestinians by Israeli security forces, international attention has once again been focused on a city claimed by both Arab and Jew.

Israel regards Jerusalem as its eternal, undivided capital, and this has fueled Israeli resentment against the UN and Washington, which do not recognize Israel's annexation of East Jerusalem.

For Israel, the Bush administration's sins are twofold. First, it supported UN Security Council Resolution 672, which condemns the recent killings, and backs the decision to send a UN delegation to Jerusalem to investigate.

Then the administration pressed Israel to guarantee it would not use US funds to build housing in the city's Arab sector.

"We insist on the sovereignty of Jerusalem," said Deputy Foreign Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Tuesday. "We think that the sending of (an investigative) delegation would impinge on that sovereignty."

Washington's perceived challenge to that sovereignty led Yosef Goell, a senior staff writer on the Jerusalem Post, to conclude in a recent column that the Bush administration is the least friendly American administration since the 1950s and is "pushing the Likud government into ... a collision course" with the US.

Shortly after Israel's Cabinet challenged Washington by rejecting the UN probe, Housing Minister Ariel Sharon announced plans to build 5,000 apartments for new Soviet immigrants in Arab East Jerusalem.

In response, the US made public an earlier letter to Secretary of State James Baker III by Foreign Minister David Levy.

The letter promised that, in return for $400 million in US-backed housing-loan guarantees, Israel would not settle Soviet Jewish immigrants beyond the "green line," Israel's pre-1967 borders.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

US-Israeli Tensions Rise over Jerusalem Incidents Israel Considers Jerusalem Its Eternal, Undivided Capital. Conflict over That View Has Fueled Resentment against Washington
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?