Universal Human Rights Fifty Years after Franklin Roosevelt's `Four Freedoms' Speech, and 200 Years after the Bill of Rights, Their Principles Are Influencing the World

By Gordon E. Baker and Ross H. Miller. Gordon E. Baker is professor of political science, and Ross H. Miller is a. doctoral candidate, . | The Christian Science Monitor, February 12, 1991 | Go to article overview
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Universal Human Rights Fifty Years after Franklin Roosevelt's `Four Freedoms' Speech, and 200 Years after the Bill of Rights, Their Principles Are Influencing the World


Gordon E. Baker and Ross H. Miller. Gordon E. Baker is professor of political science, and Ross H. Miller is a. doctoral candidate, ., The Christian Science Monitor


LAST month marked the 50th anniversary of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's famed "Four Freedoms" address to Congress. And the year 1991 commemorates the bicentennial of the Bill of Rights appended to the United States Constitution. Each of these two documents, separated by 150 years, has had a profound influence in the international arena.

Speaking on Jan. 6, 1941, President Roosevelt identified the traditional freedoms of speech and expression as the first freedom, of religion as the second. He then extended the list to include two modern concerns - freedom from want and freedom from fear. On each of these ideals, FDR emphasized the refrain - "everywhere in the world."

Traditional freedom of expression and conscience are, of course, spelled out in the First Amendment of the Bill of Rights. They reflect classical protection of the individual from government restraint. By contrast, 20th-century liberal thought insisted that these 18th-century freedoms be supplemented by meaningful freedom from want and fear. In Roosevelt's words, freedom from fear "translated into world terms, means a worldwide reduction in armaments to such a point ... that no nation will be in a position to commit an act of physical aggression against any neighbor - anywhere in the world."

President Roosevelt concluded by expressing confidence that his was not a vision of a distant millennium, but "is a definite basis for a kind of world attainable in our time and generation." Fifty years later, our appraisal must be considerably less optimistic. Yet the ideals set forth by the Four Freedoms address, as well as those proclaimed by the Bill of Rights, have had an enduring impact on international thinking.

The most obvious example of this influence is found in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in 1948. While the purpose of the American Bill of Rights was to limit the new government from encroaching on the political rights of individuals, the Declaration of Human Rights had a broader scope, the "recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family."

The preamble to the Universal Declaration celebrates the "advent of a world in which human beings should enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want" - clearly reflecting FDR's Four Freedoms address. The preamble is followed by 30 articles spelling out specific political, social, and economic rights. Parallels to certain provisions of the US Bill of Rights can be found, although in somewhat different terminology. YET the contrasts between the US Bill of Rights and the UN Declaration of Human Rights are notable. The greater scope and detail of the latter document make it nearly four times the length of the former. The UN document draws on the value systems of several cultures, even though American ideas, both earlier and modern, appear strong.

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