View from Inside Kuwait City's Porsche-Powered Resistance

By Peter Ford, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, March 5, 1991 | Go to article overview

View from Inside Kuwait City's Porsche-Powered Resistance


Peter Ford, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


ALI KHALED lifted his robes to climb down the well shaft in his back courtyard. Following him into an underground chamber, I shone my flashlight on two dozen long plastic packages secured with tape, piled on crates above the waterline. For seven months, this cache of rifles and machine guns had remained hidden from Iraqi eyes.

"Most Kuwaiti families hid things like this," Khaled said. "We were all part of the resistance."

Leaders of that resistance are reluctant to unmask themselves until the political situation in Kuwait has stabilized. But conversations with resistance officers, gunmen, and civilian organizers suggest that the movement comprised a few hundred young men who struck at the Iraqi occupation violently, shielded by a wide network of civilian supporters.

Resistance fighters say their opposition to the occupation began the first day of the invasion, when soldiers and policemen put up what fight they could against the Iraqi Army. The resistance developed around the nucleus of those soldiers, as civilians rushed police stations and Army barracks to clear out their arsenals.

"I spent five days with Army people shooting at them, but their strength was in numbers, and then they brought tanks to the area where we were," recalls Abu Mohammed, a colonel in the Kuwaiti Army, who asked that his real name not be published.

Realizing the futility of fighting street battles with the Iraqis, Abu Mohammed said, resistance fighters took off their uniforms, broke into groups of five or six, and went underground.

For security purposes, the members of each cell knew only each other, and their leader knew only his immediate superior. Since most of the officers knew each other from military service, the structure was relatively immune to Iraqi spies. Resistance leadership

At the top, according to Abu Mohammed, is a high command, comprising Army, police, and national guard officers along with civilians.

"We work as a team," he said. "There is a military side and an administrative side, and we cooperate with each other, though the leadership comes from the Army because we have the experience."

For the first several weeks of the occupation, Kuwaitis with guns sniped at Iraqi soldiers, but the Iraqis put a stop to that with violent retaliation. They reportedly shot 10 Kuwaitis in reprisal for each soldier's death, and burned or shelled houses in the area where shots had been fired. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

View from Inside Kuwait City's Porsche-Powered Resistance
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.