Education Update

By Laurel Shaper Walters - | The Christian Science Monitor, March 5, 1991 | Go to article overview

Education Update


Laurel Shaper Walters -, The Christian Science Monitor


Special offers for war veterans

A handful of colleges and universities throughout the United States are offering tuition breaks or free credits to veterans of the Persian Gulf war and, in some cases, their families.

It's an effort to "make life easier for those returning from this conflict, compared with those who returned from Vietnam and Korea," says Peter J. Liacouras, president of Temple University in Philadelphia, where Pennsylvania veterans of the war will be eligible for three free credits.

Adult workers need better schooling, too

"It is better to learn late than never," goes the old maxim. And adult learning for the workplace is the fastest-growing sector of education, according to a recent report by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

"The Learning Industry: Education for Adult Workers" estimates that United States corporations spend $60 billion a year on employee training programs. But, the report concludes, the current training resources are not well suited to keep up with technological advances.

"Our response to the needs of all workers will in large measure determine America's productivity and shape profoundly the position of the nation in an increasingly competitive, interdependent world," writes Nell P. Eurich, author of the report.

Dr. Eurich recommends more collaboration among industry, government, and educational institutions. The report suggests that all federal adult training and education programs be placed under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of Labor. They are now split between the Labor and Education departments.

"If America is to remain economically strong and vital, lifelong education is the key," writes Ernest L. Boyer, president of the Carnegie Foundation, in the report's foreword. Student warranties

"Returned for remediation" may be a common option for dissatisfied employers in the future. Some high school graduates are now coming with educational warranties. In an effort to upgrade accountability, a number of school districts are guaranteeing proficiency in reading, writing, and calculating for one to three years after graduation. …

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