US Farmers Find More Barriers to Agriculture as Environmental Regulations on Growers Increase, Many Have Begun to Rethink Their Futures in Farming

By Laurent Belsie, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 14, 1991 | Go to article overview

US Farmers Find More Barriers to Agriculture as Environmental Regulations on Growers Increase, Many Have Begun to Rethink Their Futures in Farming


Laurent Belsie, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


BIT by imperceptible bit, the United States is raising the barriers to farming.

It takes more money, more land, and more machinery to become a full-time farmer today than it did a generation ago. Bigger environmental challenges - and more-complex regulations - loom on the horizon. Private property rights are slowly slipping away from the farm operator to the larger community, which worries about agricultural pollution and the use of scarce resources.

What does all this mean? The pressures on agriculture will continue, perhaps from a new set of forces.

"I don't think anyone can foresee an end to that trend" for farming, says Lynn Daft, an agricultural consultant based in suburban Washington, D.C. "But it may be for different reasons."

Up to now, policymakers and farm groups have focused on economic pressures. Although these pressures continue to increase, new environmental and natural-resource concerns are moving to the forefront. These new concerns will make farming more complex in the future.

"In a sense, agriculture is just catching up with the rest of industry," says Carl Zulauf, an agricultural economist at Ohio State University. As a steel mill today has to follow regulations on such things as air and water emissions, so the farmer of tomorrow will face such regulations.

Dr. Zulauf says he thinks farmers will adapt to these regulations rather than leave the industry. But others aren't so sure. (See related articles.)

Consider the case of Jim Crane, a Hebron, Ohio, dairy farmer in his mid-20s. Out of his high-school graduating class of roughly 180, only four went into farming. Of those four, Mr. Crane says only he has stayed in farming.

His advantage? His grandfather sold him the farm. Farm prices are so high that it is almost prohibitive for a young person to get into the business today without family help, economists say. The real price of the average US farm has quadrupled since 1950, while the median US house has only doubled during the same period. (See chart)

In Crane's case, his grandfather bought the 160-acre farm in 1940 for $10,000.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

US Farmers Find More Barriers to Agriculture as Environmental Regulations on Growers Increase, Many Have Begun to Rethink Their Futures in Farming
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.