Australians Confront Poor Treatment of Aborigines

By Ron Scherer, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 22, 1991 | Go to article overview

Australians Confront Poor Treatment of Aborigines


Ron Scherer, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


A RECENT Royal Commission looking into the jail deaths of 99 Aborigines over a nine-year period has called into question Australia's treatment of Aboriginal people.

Earlier this year, a delegation from the World Council of Churches described Australian attitudes toward Aborigines as "not just horrific, but genocidal."

The 11-volume report issued May 9 is becoming a catalyst for a self-examination by the country. The report, says Robert Tickner, minister for Aboriginal Affairs, lays open "the harshness and oppression experienced by so many contemporary Aboriginal Australians."

The Royal Commission, which worked on the report for four years at a cost of A$30 million (US$23 million), made 339 recommendations to eliminate racist attitudes and practices.

Although Australia prides itself on its multiculturalism, many Australians agree that the country has an unhappy history in its treatment of Aborigines. Aborigines did not become part of the national census until 1967.

The white conscience was pricked in the 1970s when Prime Minister Gough Whitlam declared, "Australia's treatment of her Aboriginal people will be something upon which the rest of the world will judge Australia and Australians - not just now, but in the greater perspective of history."

Although government spending on Aboriginal affairs has increased dramatically since Mr. Whitlam's day, the government today recognizes that Aborigines remain the most disadvantaged group in society.

To the Aborigine, the biggest reminder of this disadvantage is incarceration. According to the Royal Commission report, Aborigines are 29 times more likely to be incarcerated than non-Aborigines. Frequently they are jailed for minor offenses. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Australians Confront Poor Treatment of Aborigines
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.