Baby Steps for Speech Recognition

By Laurent Belsie, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, July 3, 1991 | Go to article overview

Baby Steps for Speech Recognition


Laurent Belsie, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


HELLO and welcome to our visitor from The Christian Science Monitor.

Hal, is that you?

I am the system for real-time translation of unrestricted text into speech, developed in the Information Principles Laboratory at AT&T Bell Labs.... My inventors think my word pronunciation and intelligibility are the best around.

OK, maybe you're not Hal, the famous talking computer of "2001: A Space Odyssey." But you're a distant cousin. You tell me a children's nursery rhyme in Mandarin Chinese. You pronounce foreign names. You even get my name right (at least the American pronunciation), even though you've never seen it before.

Of course, that's the easy part. You'll say whatever Richard Sproat of Bell Labs types onto your screen. But there's more. You also understand what people say.

This is the AT&T Bell Laboratory's Flight Information System. How may I help you?

I would like to make a reservation please.

Please specify your travel plans.

I want to go from New York to Chicago on Saturday morning.

United Airlines Flight 3 leaves New York-La Guardia 10 a.m., arrives in Chicago-O'Hare at 11:18 a.m.

How much is the fare?

The round-trip coach fare is $479.

I will take the flight.

Your reservation on United Airlines Flight 3 to Chicago-O'Hare on Saturday is confirmed. Thank you.

Bell Labs is one of the leading research groups in natural- language computers. The leading edge in this technical advance is less than it sounds. For decades, people have predicted the development of speech-proficient computers.

The current systems are still crude. Bell Labs' airline-reservation system, for example, knows only 132 words. It is speaker-dependent, which means it can understand Bell Labs' David Roe. But it might not understand a foreign accent.

SRI International, the research group in Menlo Park, Calif., is probably two years away from a commercial product that could understand Japanese people saying English words. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Baby Steps for Speech Recognition
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.