Gorbachev Eclipsed? under Union Treaty, Republics Shine Brighter

By Maxim Kniazkov. Maxim Kniazkov is a former foreign correspondent with the Soviet news agency Tass. He now edits a business newsletter . | The Christian Science Monitor, July 26, 1991 | Go to article overview

Gorbachev Eclipsed? under Union Treaty, Republics Shine Brighter


Maxim Kniazkov. Maxim Kniazkov is a former foreign correspondent with the Soviet news agency Tass. He now edits a business newsletter ., The Christian Science Monitor


ONCE home after meeting the G-7 leaders in London, Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev may find out that his dream of joining the exclusive club of the world's mighty as the leader of a renewed Soviet Union is further from reality than ever before.

It is not that the USSR does not have any chance to regain its potential. But there are good chances that it will reemerge from its current crisis with a totally different political and economic structure, in which Gorbachev's role would be comparable to that of the British queen.

Reports coming from Moscow indicate that the Union Treaty, which the Soviet president so vehemently advertised to the Group of Seven in London, may not materialize in the form Gorbachev expects it to.

As proposed by the central authorities, the new draft Union Treaty provides Moscow with the right to formulate defense and foreign policies and oversee communication and transportation networks. It also gives the central government the right to control gold and diamond reserves and define energy policy. State laws will have precedence over republican laws.

Although the representatives of nine Soviet republics initialed this treaty at the end of June, many analysts consider it more a political gesture aimed at influencing the West on the eve of Gorbachev's trip to London than a sincere expression of their will. "There are areas of competence (of the central government) that are still not recognized by everyone," one of the leading Soviet reformist newspapers, Kommersant, pointed out.

The main challengers to the central government are Russia and the Ukraine, the richest and most self-sustaining of the nine republics.

* Both favor a tax system in which the republics would annually contribute a portion of their revenues to the federal budget, something that is staunchly opposed by Moscow, which is not willing to live at the mercy of the "provinces."

* While not rejecting the proposed notion of the "unified energy system" as a whole, the government of Russia opposes including into this system the republic's energy resources such as oil and coal that constitute its main wealth. This refusal renders the whole "system" meaningless.

* During his electoral campaign, Russian President Boris Yeltsin repeatedly stated that the legislation of the Russian Republic would have absolute priority over that of the Union. Speaking in Samara, an old Russian town on the bank of the river Volga, he promised to free the republic's enterprises from paying 40 percent of their hard currency earnings to the union budget and, instead, proposed that they sell a portion of these earnings to the government of Russia, a clear attempt to undermine Moscow's control over the hard currency reserves. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Gorbachev Eclipsed? under Union Treaty, Republics Shine Brighter
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.