Life Governed by the Stars?

The Christian Science Monitor, August 14, 1991 | Go to article overview

Life Governed by the Stars?


MANY of us have seen newspaper columns that make predictions about people according to the sign of the zodiac they were born under. There is enough emphasis on astrology these days to make us ask ourselves whether these "signs have any power over us. Can the positions of the stars at our birth really predict what we are and will be?

I was thinking about this the other day when I came across an arresting statement in the book of Psalms. The writer speaks of God's glory and then goes on to say, "When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained; what is man, that thou art mindful of him? I was struck also by the verses that followed. One states of man: "Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet.

The man of God's creating would not be subject to anyone but his divine Father. In other words, the "stars would have no power over him, because God, being the creator, is the only power. If we look at the life of Christ Jesus, we begin to find abundant evidence of God's presence in individual human life. Although the Gospels tell of the specially bright star that shone in the heavens at Jesus' birth, we never read that the Master alluded to it in his teachings. And he didn't offer it as a proof that he was the Messiah, or Saviour.

Instead, Jesus proved his Messiahship through healing and restoring mankind. And in doing this, he turned people away from material conditions to spiritual facts. He taught that God is Spirit and that the man He creates is spiritual as His likeness. Then it follows that to understand truly who we are, we must think of ourselves in these spiritual terms, rather than within the narrow framework of a finite, material sphere.

The distinction is important because it determines what we will allow to have control over us. …

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