Soviet Power Locus Shifts to Yeltsin the Failed Coup Seems Likely to Bring about the Very Changes Its Hard-Line Leaders Most Hoped to Avoid. Reform-Minded Republics Will Claim More Powers, and Bastions of Reaction Face Renewed Assault

By Daniel Sneider, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, August 23, 1991 | Go to article overview

Soviet Power Locus Shifts to Yeltsin the Failed Coup Seems Likely to Bring about the Very Changes Its Hard-Line Leaders Most Hoped to Avoid. Reform-Minded Republics Will Claim More Powers, and Bastions of Reaction Face Renewed Assault


Daniel Sneider, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


MIKHAIL GORBACHEV is back in the Kremlin again. But during his forced absence, the seat of power has moved down the Moscow River to Boris Yeltsin's "White House."

The stunning hard-liner coup in Moscow and its equally dramatic collapse have already indelibly altered the Soviet political map. Mr. Gorbachev returns as a man betrayed by his own ministers and generals - the very men he put in place - who first covertly and finally overtly opposed his reforms. Mr. Yeltsin now stands as the uncompromised and unquestioned leader of democratic and economic reform in the Soviet Union, lauded around the world for his courage.

By losing, the conservative Communists and their military and secret police allies may have sped up the prospects for change. The democratic forces, led by Yeltsin, now gain momentum. Gorbachev's practice of maneuvering between reformers and conservatives has lost all context as well as credibility.

It remains to be seen what kind of Gorbachev the Soviet people will now see. Will, for example, Gorbachev move resolutely to sweep out the institutions, such as the KGB and the Interior Ministry, which spearheaded the coup? How will he reorganize his own cabinet, whose leadership formed the core of the eight-man junta? And will Gorbachev remain the head of the Soviet Communist Party - the organizational base of the coup plotters?

In the days ahead the Soviet people will be watching carefully for the first signs of answers to these questions. They will also be watching how Gorbachev and Yeltsin reshape their relationship, both in private and in public. But Gorbachev's stance is less relevant now than before. It is Yeltsin, not Gorbachev, who stands as the guarantor of democratic reform in the Soviet Union.

Yeltsin seems content to have Gorbachev sit in the post of Soviet president, seeing far more future in being the president of the vast Russian Federation. But it is uncertain whether he will move to assert his newly won power in more open fashion.

While there are certainly surprises yet to come in the aftermath of the attempted coup, there is little question of where Yeltsin is likely to try to lead the Soviet Union. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Soviet Power Locus Shifts to Yeltsin the Failed Coup Seems Likely to Bring about the Very Changes Its Hard-Line Leaders Most Hoped to Avoid. Reform-Minded Republics Will Claim More Powers, and Bastions of Reaction Face Renewed Assault
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.