Man in the Middle of 19th-Century American History

By Christine L. Compston. Christine L. Compston is a Fulbright Lecturer living . | The Christian Science Monitor, August 3, 1991 | Go to article overview

Man in the Middle of 19th-Century American History


Christine L. Compston. Christine L. Compston is a Fulbright Lecturer living ., The Christian Science Monitor


WILLIAM HENRY SEWARD was, without question, a key political player in the United States during three crucial decades of the 19th century. John M. Taylor's new biography presents Seward against a background of social and political change, emphasizing his significant contributions in both domestic and foreign policy.

As governor of New York State from 1839 to 1841, Seward supported the efforts to reform prisons and the petitions of Irish Roman Catholics in the nation's largest city for more equitable treatment in terms of public education. As a lawyer and citizen, he defended the rights of blacks in his community to fair treatment under the law. As a member of the US Senate, he denounced slavery as inhumane and unjust.

Serving as Lincoln's Secretary of State, Seward oversaw relations with France, Great Britain, and Russia. His ability to dissuade them from recognizing and actively assisting the Confederacy was central to the Union victory in 1865. Convinced of the importance of the Union's maintaining good relations with Great Britain, he urged the appointment of Charles Francis Adams as US ambassador.

Target of an attempted assassination (part of the plot devised by John Wilkes Booth), Seward continued to serve in the cabinet under Andrew Johnson. Committed to a policy of territorial expansion, he negotiated for the purchase of Alaska from Russia ("Seward's folly").

This record of achievement, Taylor asserts, deserves greater consideration than it has previously been given. His point is well taken. The most recent scholarly biography, written by Glyndon Van Deusen and published in 1967, concentrates on Seward's rise in New York politics. A more comprehensive work has been needed.

Taylor's biography is not, however, a scholarly work. He adopts as his thesis an observation that Seward made about himself - that he was something of an enigma - and describes his subject as a man of great complexity, but he does not dig much below the surface in his examination or analysis. …

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