Minorities Seek More Clout on the Bench Invoking the Voting Rights Act, a Bellwether California Lawsuit Challenges the Election Process of Federal and Local Judges. US POLITICS

By Scott Armstrong, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, October 1, 1991 | Go to article overview

Minorities Seek More Clout on the Bench Invoking the Voting Rights Act, a Bellwether California Lawsuit Challenges the Election Process of Federal and Local Judges. US POLITICS


Scott Armstrong, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


HISPANICS and other minorities who have been seeking greater clout in the political arena are increasingly turning their attention to another white-dominated institution, the courts.

In a move with potentially far-reaching implications, Latinos in Monterey County in northern California have filed a federal lawsuit aimed at changing the ethnic makeup of a local court.

The move, the first of its kind in California, seeks to secure greater minority representation by challenging the system of electing local judges. A similar lawsuit was recently filed in New Mexico by native Americans.

Both actions invoke the federal Voting Rights Act to try to change the face of the judiciary. While similar lawsuits have been brought in the past, mainly by blacks in the South, the statute has been used primarily by minorities seeking greater access to legislative and executive positions.

In June, the US Supreme Court ruled that the Voting Rights Act could be used to challenge judicial elections. Thus legal experts and advocacy groups expect the law to become an increasingly popular tool to try to put more blacks, Hispanics, and others in judicial robes.

"People are moving and will move in the future to institute more lawsuits," says Robert McDuff, an attorney with the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law in Washington, D.C.

No current comprehensive statistics exist on the makeup of the American judiciary. A 1985 study by the Fund for Modern Courts in New York found that, of 12,000 full-time, law-trained judges in state courts nationwide, 12.6 percent were women and minorities.

Blacks represented 3.8 percent of the total, Hispanics 1.2 percent.

While experts believe the numbers have changed significantly in some areas since then, minority-advocacy groups argue that the judiciary remains a closed institution.

At least 16 lawsuits have been filed across the country using the Voting Rights Act to try to put more minorities on the bench. …

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Minorities Seek More Clout on the Bench Invoking the Voting Rights Act, a Bellwether California Lawsuit Challenges the Election Process of Federal and Local Judges. US POLITICS
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