Human-Rights Agency Makes Gains in Mexico Indictment in Corona Case Takes Edge off Criticism of Rights Record

By David Clark Scott, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, October 3, 1991 | Go to article overview

Human-Rights Agency Makes Gains in Mexico Indictment in Corona Case Takes Edge off Criticism of Rights Record


David Clark Scott, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


PROMINENT human-rights lawyer Norma Corona Sapien made a chilling prophecy shortly before she was gunned down in May 1990: "If something happens to me, those responsible will be Federal Judicial Police officers."

Until now, the suspected assassins remained unidentified. But her death was a crucial catalyst. Two weeks later, Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari announced the formation of the National Commission on Human Rights (CNDH).

It's taken nearly a year and a half, but last week the commission got a break in the highly publicized case, and the Salinas administration regained lost ground on human rights.

A Federal Judicial Police commander, Mario Alberto Gonzalez Trevino, was charged last Friday with the murder of Norma Corona and three other unrelated killings, as well as torture and illegal detention.

The breakthrough came on the heels of two stinging reports by Americas Watch and Amnesty International, a London-based human-rights group, that critique Mexico's human-rights situation.

"The Salinas administration has not reversed Mexico's long-standing policy of impunity for those who commit human-rights abuses," says a September America's Watch report.

Mexico's Attorney General Ignacio Morales Lechuga, who is responsible for the Federal Judicial Police, characterized Mr. Gonzalez Trevis antinarcotics work as "outstanding." But he said big drug busts did not put the commander above the law. Cracking the Corona case

Mr. Morales Lechuga credited the CNDH with cracking the case by obtaining testimony in recent days that his own investigators could not. "The witnesses had confidence in, they trusted in, the National Human Rights Commission but not in the work of us in the attorney general's office," he said at a press conference.

The movement on this case provides the CNDH with a feather in its cap. Begun last June, this ombudsman agency's main role is to investigate complaints of human-rights abuses and make recommendations to appropriate authorities. Since it began, the 260 staffers have received 4,868 complaints and made 119 recommendations. It has no legal authority but it does have President Salinas's backing.

"As currently composed, it is a force for good in Mexico," says Ellen Lutz of Americas Watch, a US-based human-rights group. "Commission President {Supreme Court Justice} Jorge Carpizo is strong, extraordinarily independent, and determined to track down abuses."

Amnesty International welcomes the legal and organizational reforms taken to date but states in its report that: "Torture continues to be widespread.... But those responsible have seldom been investigated and even more rarely prosecuted.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Human-Rights Agency Makes Gains in Mexico Indictment in Corona Case Takes Edge off Criticism of Rights Record
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.