THE WORLD FROM.Sydney with End of Cold War, Australia Explores 'Middle Power' Role as Coalition Builder on Key Issues

By Scherer, Ron | The Christian Science Monitor, October 16, 1991 | Go to article overview

THE WORLD FROM.Sydney with End of Cold War, Australia Explores 'Middle Power' Role as Coalition Builder on Key Issues


Scherer, Ron, The Christian Science Monitor


WHAT role do middle powers play in the New World Order? The answer in Australia's case, is that of a facilitator, a coalition builder of like-minded nations.

In recent months, "kangaroo diplomacy" has had some success. For example, Australia, working with Indonesia and the five permanent members (the United States, France, China, Britain, and the Soviet Union) of the United Nations Security Council, has helped to bring together the four warring Cambodian factions. Not being a central player in the conflict, Australia was able to talk to all sides.

"By sheer persistence, and the devotion of personnel and resources, Australia came up with the germ of the proposal adopted by the United Nations and translated into a settlement," says Richard Baker, an analyst with the East-West Center in Honolulu. Australia is also playing a role in the implementation of the peace accord, sending 40 men to help monitor the agreement.

And Australia and France recently headed a coalition of countries signing an international treaty to ban mining in Antarctica. Other coalitions Australia belongs to include: the Cairns Group, which supports free trade in agriculture; Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), a forum for Asian and Pacific rim nations; and the Australia Group, 20 industrial exporting countries which meet to try to control the proliferation of chemical weapons.

To be successful, a middle power has to pick its issues carefully.

"There is no prestige or likely result in enthusiastically pursuing ideas which are premature, over-ambitious, or for some other reason unlikely to generate any significant body of support," writes Sen. Gareth Evans, Australian minister for foreign affairs and trade, in a book to be published in November.

Success also requires the physical capability to network with other countries through a fair number of diplomatic posts. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

THE WORLD FROM.Sydney with End of Cold War, Australia Explores 'Middle Power' Role as Coalition Builder on Key Issues
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.