Treatment of Juvenile Offenders in California

The Christian Science Monitor, December 1, 1991 | Go to article overview

Treatment of Juvenile Offenders in California


"Behind the Wall," a recent opinion-page article, gives a distorted description of the California Youth Authority (CYA).

The primary mission of the CYA is public protection. To that end, the department believes in a person's ability to grow and change and provides the opportunity for youthful offenders to do so. It is important to note that the 8,292 youths who are incarcerated in CYA facilities have failed to be helped by any of the 58 California counties that send them to us through the court system.

The CYA does not deal only with juveniles. The ward population ranges in age from 11 to 25, and CYA institutions and camps separate juveniles from young adults. California has the only system of this kind in the nation.

According to the author, "the CYA is not tending adequately to its wards' immediate problems: dysfunctional families; drug and alcohol abuse; mental, emotional, physical, and sexual abuse." This is simply not true. A visit to any of the 11 institutions and 4 conservation camps would show that the CYA offers many programs to help incarcerated youth.

These programs, which the author neglects to mention, include: academic and vocational classes, counseling, work experience, victim impact classes, sex offender programs, drug and alcohol abuse programs, public service, intensive treatment, employment, and other specialized programs.

In our education program during the 1990-91 school year, 365 CYA youthful offenders earned high school diplomas and another 382 earned General Educational Development certificates. Fifty-three more earned Associate of Arts community college degrees and, for the first time, one Bachelor of Arts degree was earned. These are positive results for young people who usually have failed in school since kindergarten. They come to the CYA full of frustration about school - low test scores, low reading and math ability, and low motivation. The numbers who achieve academically are a testimonial to the dedication of our teachers and directly refute the dismal picture the article presents.

However, the author hits on an important point that I not only agree with, but would like to stress: "In every state, to help solve these continuing problems, parents, community members, religious leaders, and state and local legislators need to become involved in the lives of incarcerated youth. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Treatment of Juvenile Offenders in California
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.