Expected Strong Shifts in Turkey's Foreign Policy Fail to Materialize

By Sam Cohen, | The Christian Science Monitor, December 17, 1991 | Go to article overview

Expected Strong Shifts in Turkey's Foreign Policy Fail to Materialize


Sam Cohen,, The Christian Science Monitor


DESPITE expectations that Turkey's new government might abruptly shift its foreign policy, possibly to play a more assertive role in the region, government officials say only modest changes in style and approach are imminent.

With the political turmoil of a now-broken Soviet Union on its eastern border, and war-smashed Iraq to the south, Turkish Prime Minister Suleyman Demirel's new coalition government is striking a steady-as-you-go foreign policy.

The new government still faces a volatile situation along its border with Iraq, the problem of a restive Kurdish population, and the long-standing Cyprus issue.

The "fundamental objectives and principles of Turkey's international relations will not change" from the preceding administration of Turgut Ozal (now the country's president), said new Foreign Minister Hikmet Qetin. "There might be only some differences in the way our government will apply policy," he said.

Mr. Qetin is a member of the Social Democratic Populist Party, which, prior to forming a coalition with Mr. Demirel's True Path Party, was highly critical of policies followed by President Ozal, particularly during the Gulf crisis.

But the new government has made it clear in its first statements that close ties with the United States and Europe remain the major foreign policy goal.

"We are determined to develop our relations with our longtime ally, the US," Demirel said at his first news conference last week. "We want our multifaceted cooperation to be institutionalized to acquire continuity."

Both Demirel and Qetin have reemphasized the new government's desire for Turkey to become a full member of the European Community (EC).

Turkish analysts admit, however, that chances the EC will soon accept Turkey to full membership have dimmed since the the opening of Eastern Europe, applications of other European countries, and decisions at the Maastricht, Netherlands summit on economic and political union.

Particularly disappointing was the decision to offer Turkey, a NATO member, only "associate membership" to the nine-member Western European Union military organization, while showing readiness to accept Greece as a full member. …

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Expected Strong Shifts in Turkey's Foreign Policy Fail to Materialize
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