Guatemala Faces Scrutiny for Human Rights Abuses UN Commission May Vote to Group Guatemala with Cuba and Libya

By Shelley Emling, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, February 6, 1992 | Go to article overview

Guatemala Faces Scrutiny for Human Rights Abuses UN Commission May Vote to Group Guatemala with Cuba and Libya


Shelley Emling, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


WITH a cease-fire taking hold in El Salvador, Guatemala has become Central America's last bastion of armed strife.

The country's persistent human rights abuses and failure to end a 31-year-old civil war will put it under intense scrutiny at the annual meeting this month of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights.

Representatives of the Guatemalan government will tell the commission that President Jorge Serrano Elias, who has been in power only one year, needs more time to prove his willingness to investigate and prosecute abuses.

"Only a blind person cannot see this country's progress in the defense of human rights and in the organization of the justice system," President Serrano said Jan. 30.

Human rights activists will present critical reports from the United States government and the human rights group Americas Watch as evidence that little has changed since Serrano took office on Jan. 14, 1991. According to the US State Department's annual report on Guatemala, released Jan. 31, protection of human rights improved in 1991, but security forces were still almost never held responsible for human rights violations, despite overwhelming evidence.

These words will weigh heavily on the UN commission's 53 members during the meeting in Geneva, which lasts through the beginning of March. The European Community (EC) will be especially concerned with the recent killings of several Europeans in Guatemala.

"I may say we are rather preoccupied by the number of violations in Guatemala, but still consider that the government itself is doing its best to fight these violations," says Serge Abou, chief of the Central America/Mexico/Cuba section of the European Parliament. "But the armed conflict still continues, and that is a fertile field for human rights violations by both sides."

Foreign Minister Gonzalo Menendez Park and other presidential advisers traveled to Europe, Mexico, and the US in January to describe the government's progress to skeptical members of the UN commission. They explained that the government has ordered the recapture of Army Capt. Hugo Contreras, who was accused in the June 1990 murder of US citizen Michael Devine but released last year by a military court for lack of evidence.

At their next meeting later this month, government and rebel leaders are expected to sign a human rights agreement, the first step toward a cease-fire.

Since a civilian government took office six years ago, Guatemala has been reviewed in Geneva within a category reserved for countries that recognize they have problems with human rights and are working to solve them.

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