A Winter Song

The Christian Science Monitor, February 18, 1992 | Go to article overview

A Winter Song


HOW do you feel about winter? I know I once dreaded winter! We had moved from a sunny, warm area to one where cold, short days came as quite a shock. I still remember how I associated gloom with what I now enjoy. What changed?

Well, I did. One day, as I was driving, I looked out on the snowy hills and crisp blue sky and thought, "Praise God for His goodness! Later, when I looked in the Bible, I saw that the original verse, in Psalms, reads, "Praise the Lord for his goodness, and for his wonderful works to the children of men! Suddenly, that snowy landscape that had previously seemed only dreary and cold to me, looked alive with detail and beauty. More important, I caught a new glimpse of the promise of the work I was doing at that time. It seemed, too, to come sparklingly alive! As I continued to praise God in the weeks following, I stopped feeling gloomy in the winter.

I've always felt warmed by the Bible's praise of God. Often, this praise is praise for the fact that God is God. It is praise for His goodness, His love, and His perfection, which never change. It seems as if Biblical writers literally sang out praise to this God.

Such praise played a part in what Mary Baker Eddy learned of God and His creation as she discovered and founded Christian Science. She saw why praise is always due God. God is infinite, eternal Spirit who creates His offspring--man, our genuine identity--spiritual and complete. That is, His work is perfect and complete as He does it.

Praise is a recognition of this fact, not an attempt to have God add more to or improve upon what He has already done. In Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, Mrs. Eddy says, "God is not moved by the breath of praise to do more than He has already done, nor can the infinite do less than bestow all good, since He is unchanging wisdom and Love.

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