Year-Round Teaching Many Teachers Would Welcome the Chance to Work Full Time, with the Recognition and Monetary Benefits Due a Full-Time Professional

By John H. Holcomb. John H. Holcomb is director of Cross Timbers School Development Council of the Texas A & M University system. | The Christian Science Monitor, February 27, 1992 | Go to article overview

Year-Round Teaching Many Teachers Would Welcome the Chance to Work Full Time, with the Recognition and Monetary Benefits Due a Full-Time Professional


John H. Holcomb. John H. Holcomb is director of Cross Timbers School Development Council of the Texas A & M University system., The Christian Science Monitor


WHILE serving as a superintendent of schools, I heard one of my experienced teachers state that the three best things about teaching were June, July, and August. While I chuckled, I couldn't help thinking, "With comments like that, it's not surprising that parents are withdrawing their support from the public schools."

For the entire history of our public-school system, we have had extensive summer vacations. We also have vacations during the school year: Thanksgiving, Christmas break (whose length equals many adults' annual vacation), other holidays, and spring break. School is in session 175-180 days - less than half the year.

In addition, the school day is short, usually less than six hours of class time. Studies have found that "time-on-task" is the single most important factor in quality education. Yet schools generally spend about three hours a day on meaningful instruction.

The school buildings themselves usually constitute the largest single investment the community has made, larger than the city hall, county buildings, hospitals, or parks. With a 24-hour day and a 365-day year, schools are potentially available 8,760 hours a year. We use them about 1,080 hours per year - 12.3 percent of the potential time! No other business in town could survive using its facilities at 12 percent of their potential.

Many teachers spend most of September - one-ninth of the total school year - reviewing the previous year's work with the students. We are wasting a great deal of time - roughly a year and a half of a student's total public school career. If we can salvage an additional 20 minutes per day of instruction time, over the course of a student's 13-year public school career we can add 780 hours of instruction - roughly 156 days, or almost one full year.

Some educators state that students can't stand school more than 180 days, five or six hours per day. They would have us believe that students are needed at home, that children need to be outside during the summer months playing.

In high-achieving countries, students attend school up to seven hours per day, as many as 240 days per year, with no ill effects. Some studies indicate that students are healthier during the months they attend school. Most American children have little to occupy them during summer vacation. Many sleep until noon, then watch television until midnight. If both parents work, they are left either with a sitter or unsupervised much of the day. Daylight savings time gives children and their parents more than adequate daylight hours for outdoor activities.

How about educators themselves? Many people agree that teachers - at least the good ones - are underpaid. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Year-Round Teaching Many Teachers Would Welcome the Chance to Work Full Time, with the Recognition and Monetary Benefits Due a Full-Time Professional
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.