On the Origins of Creativity: What Makes the 'Juices' Flow? PBS Miniseries Looks for Clues to the Elusive Mystery of the Mind

By Alan Bunce, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 2, 1992 | Go to article overview

On the Origins of Creativity: What Makes the 'Juices' Flow? PBS Miniseries Looks for Clues to the Elusive Mystery of the Mind


Alan Bunce, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


WITH film stars and cartoons and lots of money, public TV has launched a major two-front campaign to pin down the unpinnable: creativity itself.

The bigger push comes in September, with the premiere of "Behind the Scenes," a series for children about how the visual and performing arts are actually created. Already six years in the making, it has received big funding from business and foundations, as well as $1.5 million from the National Endowment for the Arts - the largest grant yet awarded by the NEA for a TV series.

The other front opens tonight with the first of a four-part weekly series called "The Creative Spirit" (PBS, 8-9 p.m., check local listings). Unlike "Behind the Scenes," the current effort is not limited to the arts but lumps everything from business theory to housework under its catchall and slightly amorphous concept of creativity. But it does so convincingly, with a lively production style that manages to be engaging without trivializing one of the most easily trivialized of subjects. "Creativity," like "art" and "philosophy," has traditionally eluded airtight definition by philosophers and scientists, so you can't expect it suddenly to be nailed down by TV.

Yet the opener, "Inside Creativity," does establish a new respect for the brilliance and commitment of people in many pursuits. Even if you don't learn what creativity actually is, you'll know what it feels like to a sailor, for instance, who tells of guiding his small craft through dangerous seas by deciding "not to think about" what he was doing, by letting his skills merge into instinct.

The best moments, in fact - the times you feel closest to sharing the experience of creativity - are when people tell of entering and returning from this non-logical zone of the mind without quite being able to describe it. You discover where a jazz musician like Benny Golson looks for inspiration - in the darkness of his thought, which he says he must face to find lurking ideas. You hear animator Chuck Jones talk about facing the monster, the darkness, as he does his best work. And in next week's show, "Creative Beginnings," you learn a little about how creativity works in kids, and how easily it can be smothered.

It's all part of a deftly integrated format of talking heads, abstract animation, and lots of glimpses: a college classroom, a doctor's office, and a spectrum of other places where this production, resourcefully and with rewarding open-mindedness, finds the creative spirit at work. …

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