Cherubs and Angels Praise Guercino's Art the Italian Baroque Master Is Featured in Two Shows at the National Gallery

By Louise Sweeney, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 7, 1992 | Go to article overview

Cherubs and Angels Praise Guercino's Art the Italian Baroque Master Is Featured in Two Shows at the National Gallery


Louise Sweeney, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


TWIN shows are now starring at the National Gallery, and they are both the work of Guercino (Italian for "the squinter"), who triumphed over that nickname to become the master painter of the Italian baroque.

"Guercino: Drawings from Windsor Castle" and "Guercino: Master Painter of the Baroque" have been brought together for the 400th birthday of the artist (whose real name was Giovanni Francesco Barbieri). This is the first American exhibition of 60 of his paintings from European sources, along with 60 of his drawings from the world's finest collection at Windsor Castle. Most of the works in the double exhibition have never been seen before in the United States.

Sir Denis Mahon, an internationally known expert on Guercino, answered a reporter's question on how he compared and contrasted the paintings and drawings:

"Well, that's an impossible question. Guercino is essentially a spontaneous artist," he says. "Of course, you get his personality in drawings, because these were not public documents, they were private documents. He throws himself into {them}. Of course, a painting is a more public thing. It has to be exhibited to the public and so on. They're different things, but they're part of the same personality.

"But the spontaneity exists in the drawings, and of course in the earlier paintings, you see the same sort of spontaneity there as in the drawings. Later on a very delicate discipline suddenly comes over him."

The Hon. Jane Roberts, curator of the Print Room at Windsor Castle, points out that the drawings were seldom made independently of the paintings. Because the drawings are preparatory for the paintings, she says, "the drawings are a very good way into the paintings."

We enter the first three galleries of drawings, before the eight galleries of paintings.

The drawings range from the sublime "Angel of the Annunciation" (1638-1639) to the grotesque: a three-faced man beset by devils in "Symbolic or Magical Subject."

In "David With the Head of Goliath" one can see the contrast between the original drawing with the monumental head bloodied on the ground at David's left knee; and the painting, in which David kneels on the body, his foot on Goliath's chin.

The drawing of "Atlas Standing, Slightly Turned to the Left" and other variations, when compared to his painting "Atlas," shows that the drawing was reversed like a mirror image in the painting, and that the huge navy-blue world, red scarf, and struggling bearded man in the painting grew out of the drawing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cherubs and Angels Praise Guercino's Art the Italian Baroque Master Is Featured in Two Shows at the National Gallery
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.