Cambodian Peacekeeping

By Heather M. O'Brien. Heather M. O'Brien, an affiliate of the East Asian Institute, Columbia University, was formerly Un helping develop programs . | The Christian Science Monitor, April 22, 1992 | Go to article overview

Cambodian Peacekeeping


Heather M. O'Brien. Heather M. O'Brien, an affiliate of the East Asian Institute, Columbia University, was formerly Un helping develop programs ., The Christian Science Monitor


THE United Nations has launched its largest peacekeeping operation in history, the UN Transition Authority in Cambodia (UNTAC), despite major budget problems. Security Council donors cannot afford the UN's potentially greatest success to become its biggest failure, nor deny Cambodia its first democratic elections and its best chance at peace.

The race against the May monsoon season is on; a budget crunch delayed deployment of the 22,000 UN contingent for the 18-month, $1.9 billion operation. UNTAC must be deployed now if it is to succeed in its tasks: monitoring the cease-fire, demobilizing and cantoning the four warring military forces, supervising the existing Phnom Penh government, and organizing elections.

The repatriation of more than 380,000 displaced Cambodians from camps in Thailand started late last month, despite renewed fighting, banditry, lawlessness, and uncleared land mines. The primary security threat to Cambodians and UN personnel is hundreds of thousands of unmapped mines that inflicted more injuries during Cambodia's 12-year war than any other weapon.

The task of repatriating and resettling more than 500,000 Cambodians displaced from their homes is riddled with challenges: from land-rights conflicts between landlords occupying the past homes of returnees, to questions of overlapping mandates between various UN agencies, such as who will pay to feed and resettle demobilized troops not considered refugees.

Disarming 200,000 soldiers and 250,000 militia personnel, and gathering more than 300,000 weapons from guerrilla forces that traditionally melt into villages and hide in isolated mountains is no easy task. UN troops must be free to investigate for hidden militia and arms caches - a right which Khmer Rouge already denies UN forces.

To save cantonment expenses, the UN would like 100 percent demobilization, but as that is tantamount to surrender, Prime Minister Hun Sen politely refused. To maintain the largest military base as a post-election insurance policy, guerrillas are quietly moving military families inside Cambodia, calling it "voluntary demobilization."

Setting a peacekeeping precedent, the UN will place the five key ministries of the Phnom Penh government under the "direct control" of UNTAC civil administrators. While the coalition Supreme National Council enshrines Cambodian sovereignty, for the first time an international organization will supervise and control the functioning of a sovereign state to maintain a level political playing field. UNTAC won't have even a skeletal state to run unless it gets there soon to maintain basics like electricity and communications. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cambodian Peacekeeping
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.