California Program Praised Welfare-to-Work Plan That Stresses Education Shows Some Promising Results. WELFARE REFORM

By Daniel Wood, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 23, 1992 | Go to article overview
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California Program Praised Welfare-to-Work Plan That Stresses Education Shows Some Promising Results. WELFARE REFORM


Daniel Wood, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


THE first solid evidence is in that a new federal approach to welfare begun in 1988 - to educate and put recipients back on the job - works.

The validation comes in an analysis of the largest welfare program in the United States to have adopted a welfare-to-work approach, California's Greater Avenues for Independence, or GAIN, program.

In the project's first year of operation under the new federal guidelines, welfare spending fell and participants' earnings increased in as little as 12 months. Longer-term effects are expected to be even greater.

"This is the first clear indication that a program with strong emphasis on basic education can also show significant impacts on employment and earnings the first year," says Mark Greenberg, senior staff attorney at the Washington-based Center for Law and Social Policy.

The news is expected to fuel fresh support in dozens of states to participate more fully in the federal JOBS program (Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training), the centerpiece of the sweeping 1988 Family Support Act. The federal program provides up to $1 billion annually for state welfare-to-work initiatives. Only 60 percent of those funds, offered as matching grants, are currently being used.

Released today by the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC), in New York City, the study included 33,000 welfare recipients in six California counties covering about half the state's welfare population from mid-1988 to 1990.

Although results varied by county, MDRC found that single parents (mostly mothers) in GAIN earned 17 percent more on average than members of a control group. The GAIN group also received 5 percent less in welfare payments during the same period.

Individual counties showed even better gains than the overall figures, which were kept low by first-year averages. In Riverside County, for instance, the average earnings for single parents increased 65 percent and welfare payments dropped by 12 percent.

The program operates in more than 58 counties under the supervision of the State Department of Social Services.

Activities include job-seeking assistance; basic education (general education, adult basic, and English-as-second-language); occupational-skills training; on-the-job training; and preemployment preparation. California has spent nearly $115 million since 1989 in GAIN. It's gotten back $3 for every $2 invested.

GAIN is a mandatory participation program with a strong emphasis on education. Recipients who fail to participate without good cause in GAIN's services can have their welfare grants reduced or terminated.

Nationwide, cries for welfare reform have been amplified in recent years by recession-strapped states scrambling to minimize growing budget deficits.

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California Program Praised Welfare-to-Work Plan That Stresses Education Shows Some Promising Results. WELFARE REFORM
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