Poised for Stanford's Top Post University of Chicago Provost Gerhard Casper Talks about His New Position, US Universities

By Laurel Shaper Walters, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 27, 1992 | Go to article overview

Poised for Stanford's Top Post University of Chicago Provost Gerhard Casper Talks about His New Position, US Universities


Laurel Shaper Walters, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


AFTER accepting the presidency of Stanford University, German-born Gerhard Casper joked that he was hired for his ability to pronounce the university's informal motto: Die Luft der Freiheit weht (the wind of freedom is blowing).

Yet Mr. Casper, who is known for his good-natured humor and engaging charm, is well aware that the job will require more than proper pronunciation.

Last summer, following disclosures that Stanford overcharged the goverment for the indirect costs of federal research, Donald Kennedy announced his resignation as president of the Palo Alto, Calif., campus. The controversy has left the university in turmoil for more than a year. Casper, who has been provost at the University of Chicago since 1989, is a respected administrator and legal scholar. On Sept. 1, he takes over as the ninth president of 101-year-old Stanford.

In an interview at the University of Chicago, Casper spoke about his new position and the state of American universities in general.

Why are you willing to take on the presidency of Stanford, despite the difficulty of the times?

I came to the conclusion that the fundamentals at Stanford are very good indeed....

The last two years have been very tough on Stanford, in the sense that Washington has focused on Stanford, the press has focused on Stanford. But, of course, the focus has all been more or less on what went wrong in terms of accounting controls.... Very little was ever said about Stanford's contributions to what you might call the national welfare....

As the provost at Chicago, I still was thinking of Stanford as a very major competitor. There have been no dramatic changes.

But there has been an erosion of trust. How do you expect to regain public confidence in the university?

First ... by completing whatever will remain to be completed ... to make sure that Stanford has appropriate controls in place.

Second, by pointing out that Stanford is an institution of higher education that has very few equals. That it would be very easy to destroy. But that it is infinitely more important to keep going.... It takes decades or sometimes centuries to build up institutions of this quality. It takes almost no time to destroy them, and the costs of that to the country would be tremendous.

Now, how would I as president of Stanford get that message across? Well, in part, my accent helps. I am in the United States because I was captivated by the best in the United States. I was a student at Yale, I was a faculty member at the University of California at Berkeley, I have spent more than a quarter of a century at the University of Chicago. I am in the United States because I think the best American universities have no equals in the world.

Are you concerned that American universities are losing their luster?

I am concerned that they are losing their luster, and I'm concerned because if we get into the habit of university bashing we will make everybody lose confidence.

University bashing is not the same as criticizing universities. Universities make mistakes, and the mistakes should be criticized. But it's quite a different thing to bash, and I think we have seen a fair amount of bashing in the last year or so.

We have come to expect an awful lot of universities.... The demands are increasing all the time, and one of the dangers I see is that we are ... going to divert universities from what they are primarily about, which is to teach the next generation and to do research. And those two things go together. I have never seen a conflict between teaching and research. I think they are just two sides of the same coin.

But there is a great deal of tension between teaching and research. How do you plan to alleviate that at Stanford?

Yes, the tension is there.... When I became provost here I thought we should monitor the quality of our teaching performance more than we had, and I established a standing committee of the faculty called the Council on Teaching that is to help in all of this.

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Poised for Stanford's Top Post University of Chicago Provost Gerhard Casper Talks about His New Position, US Universities
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