The Line to Santa Marta in El Salvador, a US Rural Electrification Crew Hooks Up a Village after Country's Civil War

By Bob Gibson, | The Christian Science Monitor, May 14, 1992 | Go to article overview

The Line to Santa Marta in El Salvador, a US Rural Electrification Crew Hooks Up a Village after Country's Civil War


Bob Gibson,, The Christian Science Monitor


THE government soldiers behind the sandbags at the checkpoint in Villa Victoria had never met a gringo like Bob Dalton before. He was not a journalist or a human-rights worker, the North Americans who frequently made their way to the battle front during El Salvador's 12-year civil war.

Mr. Dalton was an electric lineman, and he first barreled into the village last October in his white Chevy pickup with the Idaho plates and a hard hat on the seat beside him.

His appearance foreshadowed a major change in El Salvador. He and a crew of local men were building an electric line to serve the guerrilla village of Santa Marta, about four miles beyond Villa Victoria.

The electrification project started as a peace negotiation gambit, but it's become a serious effort to even out the social and economic inequities that fueled El Salvador's civil war.

Santa Marta is a cluster of adobe-walled, tin-roofed buildings lying in a bowl between dry hills. It looks like just another poor village, but during the war it was a major supply base for soldiers of the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front (FMLN).

The idea for the electric line began when then-US ambassador William G. Walker spent a night in Santa Marta last September, petitioning the leaders of one of the five FMLN factions to speed the peace process.

"They admired Walker for having the guts to walk into the boca del tigre, the mouth of the tiger," says George Biddle, president of the Washington-based Institute for Central American Studies, a non-partisan research center.

Walker asked the rebels what the United States could do to show good faith. The FMLN asked for electricity for Santa Marta.

To the FMLN, "the electric line was the first sign that the US was serious about a peaceful El Salvador, evidence that the US wanted to help all of El Salvador, not just one side," says Mr. Biddle. A peace agreement was reached on Jan. 16.

When Dalton and his crew started work on the line, the only signs of guerrilla soldiers were a few shadowy figures watching impassively from a screen of trees.

Then one day they were surprised while eating lunch in the middle of Santa Marta. "There were 150 to 200 guerrillas marching toward us in full combat dress," Dalton says. "The crew all jumped into the back of my pickup. My first instinct was to run, but there was nowhere to go."

When a man at the front of the column carrying a briefcase and a .45-caliber pistol in one pocket asked who was in charge, all fingers pointed to Dalton.

Dalton explained the project as the man studied his business card.

"Then he said it was true that they wanted electricity, and that it was OK for a gringo to be in his town," says Dalton. The man was Raul Hercules, a high-ranking FMLN commandante who had just been flown back to Santa Marta in a United Nations helicopter from the peace talks in Mexico City.

From that point on, the guerrilla soldiers were friendly. One day a passing platoon suggested that the crew pack up for the day because a fight with the army was brewing. On the way back to Villa Victoria, Dalton recalls, mortar rounds began to fall in the hills behind them.

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