No to Superstition!

The Christian Science Monitor, June 24, 1992 | Go to article overview
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No to Superstition!


IN films and books, superstitious people are often portrayed as ignorant or foolish. Yet sometimes those of us who think we know better find superstition filling us with anxiety and fear.

The basis of such fears is ignorance that is assuaged by gaining a greater knowledge of God as all-powerful Love and of our relationship to Him as His spiritual offspring. Christ Jesus' mission was to open our eyes to God as Spirit, infinite good, and to show us our unbreakable unity with Him. Evil doesn't come from God, our divine Father. Nor can evil attack any of His children. As Jesus showed us, God's love for man is impartial and unlimited.

In his Sermon on the Mount, found in Matthew, Christ Jesus asked, "What man is there of you, whom if his son ask bread, will he give him a stone? He went on to say that if we could understand goodness enough to take care of our children, "how much more shall your Father which is in heaven give good things to them that ask him?

Yet even when we are willing to accept the goodness of God, sometimes we find it hard to overcome the nagging fear that a particular superstition really does have power over us. At moments like this, the surest answer is found in prayer to God and in the realization that He is ever-present and all-powerful good. This means we can never be cut off from Him. While we may not see this all at once, if we continue to pray to know that man is God's likeness, governed only by Him, we will be led to the right steps for our individual progress.

We overcome evil as we understand that superstition is only a powerless belief of what the New Testament refers to as the carnal mind. Sometimes the impulses of this mind toward sin, anger, or fear may seem to be our own thoughts. But such impulses are never part of our true, spiritual identity, and this mind must be put off if we are to know our true unity with God.

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