Human Rights versus Development

By Knickerbocker, Brad | The Christian Science Monitor, June 25, 1992 | Go to article overview

Human Rights versus Development


Knickerbocker, Brad, The Christian Science Monitor


THE recent Earth Summit in Brazil illustrated as never before the split between North and South, between the richer industrialized countries and those still struggling to develop their full economic potential.

Second only to the United States as a symbol of inequality and just about everything else that's wrong with the world (at least in the eyes of many critics from poorer countries) were the international financial institutions distributing aid for development projects. It's not that such countries don't want the aid, but that too often the projects aren't necessarily in the best interests of those they are meant to help.

The most extreme view was expressed by the head of the "Third World Network," Martin Khor of Malaysia, who called the World Bank "one of the greatest promoters of poverty and environmental destruction in the world."

Andrew Steer, who directs the World Bank's annual development report, acknowledged in meeting with Mr. Khor and other nongovernment representatives that the bank "should listen more closely to the people."

That point was made most graphically last week with the release of a special World Bank-commissioned report on one of its most controversial undertakings, the Narmada Valley Project in India. After 10 months of study, this independent review identified "serious deficiencies in the measures taken to safeguard the human rights of thousands of people and to ameliorate the environmental impacts of the world's largest hydroelectric and irrigation complexes."

"It seems clear that engineering and economic imperatives have driven the projects to the exclusion of human and environmental concerns," says the report, whose lead author was Bradford Morse, a former US congressman who once headed the United Nations Development Program.

The project, which has been in the works for three decades, includes 30 large dams, 135 medium-sized dams, and another 3,000 smaller dams along the Narmada River. The largest of these is the Sardar Sarovar project, which will create one of the world's largest artificial lakes by flooding 33,947 acres.

The project is supposed to bring irrigation and drinking water to millions of Indians. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Human Rights versus Development
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.