The North American Free Trade Agreement: Who Benefits in The

The Christian Science Monitor, August 7, 1992 | Go to article overview

The North American Free Trade Agreement: Who Benefits in The


The editorial "Free Trade's Rough Ride," July 24, seems to under emphasize the importance of environmental and labor concerns in the analysis of the long-term benefits of the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Reports about the effects of the agreement with Canada seem to indicate serious problems between longtime friendly neighbors that could have been eliminated by including labor representatives and environmentalists on an equal basis in the preliminary negotiations. There are strong indications that the treaty's terms only emphasize the erosion of democracy that is threatening our economy and stability. When we dream of "One World" we must certainly include all of the world's people. Dorothy Peterson, New Providence, Pa. Freedom of speech

The editorial "The Mouths of Babes," July 28, is admirable insofar as it goes. It ignores, however, the core issue: the need to reinterpret the First Amendment to reflect its original purpose - to protect not filth and incitement to murder but that free flow of opinion necessary to an informed citizenry and a socially responsible electorate. If this change is still possible, the degeneration of national morals can be curbed at its source. Nathaniel Weyl, Sky Valley, Ga. `Breakthrough Leaders'

Thank you for publishing "Halting the Clenched Fist of Abuse," July 28. The plight of the battered wife is not some new phenomenon, of course, or merely the result of drunkenness or drug abuse. The only thing new is that society is now offering an escape for the woman.

It used to be that if a neighbor or one of the children called the police, the officer would merely chide the husband and perhaps mention that he was tired of responding to such calls.

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