Bill Clinton and the KGB George Bush Assails Bill Clinton's `Judgment' for Protests Overseas and a Visit to Russia in 1969. but Does This Attack Use Good Judgment?

By Paul R. Wieck. Paul R. Wieck is a Washington-based reporter. | The Christian Science Monitor, October 15, 1992 | Go to article overview

Bill Clinton and the KGB George Bush Assails Bill Clinton's `Judgment' for Protests Overseas and a Visit to Russia in 1969. but Does This Attack Use Good Judgment?


Paul R. Wieck. Paul R. Wieck is a Washington-based reporter., The Christian Science Monitor


THE Bush camp's new effort to turn Bill Clinton's bit part in the anti-war movement that swept the country 25 years ago, plus a student trip to Moscow, into something akin to treason is the latest evidence that President Bush has strayed far from his Yankee heritage and, as Mr. Clinton reminded him in Sunday night's debate, the example of his father, the late Sen. Prescott Bush of Connecticut.

The elder Bush was one of few senators who had the courage to denounce Sen. Joe McCarthy of Wisconsin for the reckless charges he made against foreign-affairs experts in the mid-1950s.

As strategies go, the attack on Clinton is not new. In the 1960s, attempts were made to link the anti-war movement, civil rights protests, inner-city riots, and student uprisings at leading universities to subversive influences.

But efforts to find such a link proved futile. A classified report prepared for the Central Intelligence Agency on student protests in a number of countries in 1968 found "there is no convincing evidence of control, manipulation, sponsorship, or significant financial support of student dissidents by any international communist authority."

The Kerner Commission, set up in 1967 by President Lyndon Johnson to delve into the causes of rioting in inner-cities, found the turmoil rooted in "unusual, irregular, complex, and unpredictable social processes." The riots "were not caused by nor were they the consequences of any organized plan or conspiracy," the commission's report stated.

The CIA report, "Restless Youth," found that student dissidence worldwide was "shaped in every instance by local conditions." It cited student strikes led by Mark Rudd at Columbia University, by Rudi Duschke at Berlin's Free University, and by Daniel Cohn-Bendit in Paris. The authors of the CIA report pointed repeatedly to a deep contempt Kremlin leaders felt for long-haired, undisciplined rebels coming out of Western society. Pravda's Yuri Zhukov called them "werewolves" who would split progressive movements. They called Mr. Cohn-Bendit "a provacateur."

Bush's surrogates, also trying to exaggerate Clinton's quite minor role in the anti-war movement in 1969, say he met with former organizers for Sen. Eugene McCarthy's 1968 presidential campaign at Martha's Vineyard. They also speak of Clinton's "role" in the Vietnam Moratorium in 1969.

Actually there were two meetings on Martha's Vineyard. The first was in a private home after the Democratic Convention in Chicago in 1968; the meeting was an unsuccessful effort to agree on what to do in that fall's election. The next summer the group returned for what attendee David Mixner called "sort of like a Big Chill reunion." Clinton, never part of the Eugene McCarthy crowd, was invited to the second meeting mainly to bolster the group's Southern contingent, which by then consisted only of Taylor Branch, today a Pulitzer Prize-winning author.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bill Clinton and the KGB George Bush Assails Bill Clinton's `Judgment' for Protests Overseas and a Visit to Russia in 1969. but Does This Attack Use Good Judgment?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.