End of an Era in US-Philippine Relations

By David D. Newsom. David D. Newsom, former undersecretary of state, is Cumming Memorial Professor of International Affairs, University of Virginia. He was Us ambassador to the Philippines . | The Christian Science Monitor, October 28, 1992 | Go to article overview
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End of an Era in US-Philippine Relations


David D. Newsom. David D. Newsom, former undersecretary of state, is Cumming Memorial Professor of International Affairs, University of Virginia. He was Us ambassador to the Philippines ., The Christian Science Monitor


IN late September, the United States withdrew from the Subic Bay Naval Base in the Philippines. In November, the last US forces in the islands will leave a smaller facility near Manila.

Remarkably, in the US, the closing of Subic Bay, once the largest American base abroad, went virtually without notice. Television coverage was scant; even major newspapers marked the departure with short articles and pictures. There was no editorial comment, either of regret or resignation.

Undoubtedly, the lack of attention was due in part to the preoccupation with the election campaign, but it stemmed also from a general public belief that the cold war had removed the principal rationale for such bases; the Philippines was now less important.

For Filipinos, these events mark the end of the colonial era. Although, undoubtedly, many affected by the closures regretted the departure, significant portions of the country's political elite did not consider independence complete as long as the US bases remained.

Throughout the post-World War II period, for official Washington, at least, the bases have been the most important aspect of the US-Philippine relationship. Filipinos have resented this emphasis, and many Americans, also, have regretted that other aspects of the friendship have not been given greater weight. It would be equally regrettable now if the US lost interest in the former colony, either because of a lack of recognition of common interests or out of resentment that "they threw us out."

Common interests remain, even in the military realm. A Mutual Defense Treaty remains in effect. Although differences of interpretation have existed between the two countries over the mutual obligations, it nevertheless commits the US to a continuing interest in the security of the Philippines.

Given the opposition to the presence of the bases and the changing world situation, a US withdrawal was ultimately inevitable. Although President Fidel Ramos favored the retention of the facilities for some years more, he is not likely to reverse the departure. He is, however, reportedly willing to discuss the servicing of US ships and, possibly, the use of air-target ranges in the country; the possibilities of military cooperation have not ended.

The US remains the Philippines' largest trading partner; the US is the largest foreign investor.

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