New Bill May Not Ease California Water Shortage Pro-Cities, Pro-Wildlife Legislation That Loosens Farming's Hold on Valley Project Is Called `Too Little, Too Late' by Critics

By Daniel B. Wood, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, November 24, 1992 | Go to article overview

New Bill May Not Ease California Water Shortage Pro-Cities, Pro-Wildlife Legislation That Loosens Farming's Hold on Valley Project Is Called `Too Little, Too Late' by Critics


Daniel B. Wood, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


A MAJOR chapter in California's decades-long water war is opening with a big test for a new truce.

Federal legislation that loosens agriculture's hold on the state's enormous Central Valley Project (CVP) in favor of cities and wildlife was signed Oct. 30 by President Bush. But the measure, which ended years of highly contested reform efforts, comes amid predictions of an unprecedented seventh year of drought, now the state's worst in more than 400 years.

"Agriculture is going to have a harder time than ever," says Mary Ann Warmerdam, director of natural resources for the California Farm Bureau Federation. Noting that the new bill gives priority allotments to fish and wildlife and allows farmers to sell unused allotments, she says current conditions may raise unfair expectations that there will be anything left to sell.

"Water storage is down, new predictions are down," she says, "so the gains envisioned {by the bill may be on hold for a while."

The new concerns about devastating effects from the drought are discussed in last week's report by the state Department of Water Resources (DWR). Using tree-ring records and written data nearly a century old, state hydrologists predict that the dry season will extend well into its seventh year - the worst drought since 1560.

"The report is saying that we're headed for a situation the state has never been in before," DWR spokesman Allen Jones says. Noting that storage levels in the 155 major reservoirs are at 56 percent of average, and down 5 percent from last season's six-year low, he says the state's 30 million people will have to rely almost solely on rainfall for the coming year.

"Considering recent precipitation levels, that is not a good situation to be in," he adds.

Cumulative effects of the past six years have left many areas so dry that 10 percent of any precipitation will be soaked up before reaching rivers and streams, officials say. New restrictions on taking water from the Sacramento River Delta, intended to protect endangered species of winter-run salmon and delta smelt, will make matters worse. And there have been new restrictions on diverting water from the Owens Valley to Los Angeles, the state's largest water user.

Beginning two years ago, emergency rationing and mandatory conservation programs were begun in many cities. Though some restrictions have been relaxed in communities such as Santa Barbara and areas of San Diego, officials see resumption of such programs or severe cutbacks in deliveries to agriculture and urban users.

Such predictions are also dampening enthusiasm for the sweeping reforms envisioned by proponents of by the federal water bill. …

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