Human Rights and Peace

The Christian Science Monitor, December 4, 1992 | Go to article overview

Human Rights and Peace


IN Freeport, Maine, not too long ago, pieces of the Berlin Wall were displayed. One inscription on these pieces said, "Forget not the tyranny of this wall--horrid place. Nor the love of freedom that made it fall--laid waste!

Much has happened since that hopeful, heady time. The message of freedom's power still rings through history and through our lives. Despite this progress, however, situations in a variety of other countries show that basic freedoms cannot be taken for granted.

Such challenges to human rights are not new. Paul, one of Christ Jesus' followers, and other Christians were regularly imprisoned by those who did not understand their teachings and their purpose. Prophets such as Elijah and Jeremiah were threatened with death or imprisoned. Martin Luther faced death in connection with his efforts to reform the Christian Church during his day. And in modern times civil-rights workers --and those brave people who brought down the Berlin Wall-- faced down danger and death.

One common thread that runs through commentary by people engaged in this struggle for freedom is the power of prayer to change the course of events. And prayer can be our way to join the continuing work for peace and human rights.

Paul's writings in the Bible offer much food for thought in connection with liberty. One statement in his second letter to the Corinthians says something significant about the atmosphere of freedom. He tells the Corinthians: "Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty."

The liberty of which Paul is speaking isn't political freedom, per se. It is, rather, an understanding that each of us is actually a spiritual idea of God and can never be cut off from His presence. No prison, no war zone, no lonely night, is beyond the reach of divine Love. Christ Jesus proved this even in the tomb. Our prayers can affirm this for ourselves, for our friends, and for our neighbors around the world. We can listen to news reports about troubled areas and specifically pray to know God's permanent love for His man.

Claiming the unbreakable unity of God and man, while not a political act, can open the way for individuals and nations to find freedom. And when we do this, we are helping the nations to progress.

Individually, we can also strive to live within the atmosphere of divine Love by treating those around us as we would want to be treated. Expressing love and respect for our fellow humans--no matter what their race, gender, national origin, or creed--affirms our willingness to live in accord with the impartial love that God gives all of His children. And loving others helps us as well.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Human Rights and Peace
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.