`Hands On' Masterpieces Computers, Videos, and Puzzles Educate Visitors to `Art Inside Out'

By Elizabeth Levitan Spaid, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 7, 1992 | Go to article overview

`Hands On' Masterpieces Computers, Videos, and Puzzles Educate Visitors to `Art Inside Out'


Elizabeth Levitan Spaid, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


MANY people think art museums are stuffy institutions where paintings loom high on walls, objects are displayed in enclosed glass cases, and the only sounds are hushed voices and footsteps echoing through corridors.

An exhibit at the Art Institute of Chicago aims to change that perception.

"Art Inside Out: Exploring Art and Culture through Time" is an interactive display designed to help children age 6 and older (as well as adults) understand selected works of art and the cultures they represent.

The idea is to "make art accessible" to the public, says Jean Sousa, project director of "Art Inside Out" and associate director of the museum's Department of Museum Education.

In gallery space designated for art-education programs, 12 masterworks chosen from the museum's permanent collections are presented. The objects include paintings, sculpture, and decorative arts from African, Asian, Ancient American, European, and 20th-century collections.

Encircling this "core" area are alcoves that explore the origin of six of the objects through videos, puzzles, and learning activities.

For instance, "The Adoration of the Magi," attributed to Italian Renaissance artist Raffaello Botticini, is displayed in the main corridor. Visitors can enter an area behind the painting to learn more about the Renaissance. An exhibit shows how paint was made with egg yolks and water; to understand how artists used perspective, kids and adults can peer through a hole at a model scene and see lines converge at the vanishing point. …

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