China Gives Exit Visas to Pro-Democracy Critics While Beijing Frees or Expels Dissidents, Its Ban on Political Expression Persists

By Sheila Tefft, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 15, 1992 | Go to article overview

China Gives Exit Visas to Pro-Democracy Critics While Beijing Frees or Expels Dissidents, Its Ban on Political Expression Persists


Sheila Tefft, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


AFTER months under the constant eye of security police, outspoken journalist Zhang Weiguo said last week that he is being allowed to leave China for the United States.

Mr. Zhang, former Beijing correspondent of the banned World Economic Herald of Shanghai, told the Monitor in a telephone interview that he has been invited to be a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He plans to focus on human rights and development of news media in China since economic reforms were launched in 1978.

Although he expects to receive his passport by Dec. 25, Zhang said he will postpone departure until January for health reasons. He intends to return to China.

"Being allowed to go overseas should not be taken as a major sign of improvement in China's human rights record. Much more attention should be given to human rights issues as a whole," Zhang said from his Shanghai home. "China is changing, and the study of human rights in China is in its beginning stage. A lot of work has to be done."

Zhang's departure comes as China continues to try to mute condemnation of its human rights record following the June 4, 1989, massacre of pro-democracy demonstrators in Beijing. In 1991, China pledged to then-Secretary of State James Baker III that it would grant exit visas to citizens not facing legal charges.

In August, China gave a passport to labor activist Han Dongfang, allowing him to seek medical treatment in the US.

And last month, Bao Zunxin, a former scholar at the China Academy for Social Sciences, was released on probation 19 months before the end of a five-year term imposed for his involvement in the Beijing demonstrations.

Yet while Beijing frees or expels some troublesome dissidents, the Communist dictatorship is not lifting its lid on political expression, Western and Chinese observers say.

In recent weeks, Chinese secret police have detained several dissidents linked to the return this year of pro-democracy activist Shen Tong. Mr. Shen, who fled to the US after the brutal crackdown on demonstrators in Beijing, came back to China in July, was arrested in September, and expelled to the US in October.

Activists say that Chinese police, in arresting Shen, may have captured detailed records of China's dissident network. Several activists who met Shen have since been detained, including An Ning, an archaeology graduate of Beijing University, and Meng Zhongwei, a former student at Zhengzhou University.

Recently, Li Honglin, a prominent advocate of political and economic reform and a scholar at the Fujian Academy of Social Sciences, was denied permission to leave China to lecture at several American universities. …

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