A Civil Rights Heroine

By Elizabeth Levitan Spaid. Elizabeth Levitan Spaid is on the Monitor's . | The Christian Science Monitor, January 22, 1993 | Go to article overview

A Civil Rights Heroine


Elizabeth Levitan Spaid. Elizabeth Levitan Spaid is on the Monitor's ., The Christian Science Monitor


INTO her mid-40s, Fannie Lou Hamer weighed cotton for a white plantation owner in the Mississippi Delta. Uneducated and dirt poor, she lived in a small frame house that had no working indoor toilet, "while her boss's dog had its own bathroom in the main house," according to a new biography.

So in 1962, when civil rights workers arrived in her tiny hometown of Ruleville, Miss., urging blacks to register to vote, Mrs. Hamer needed little prodding. She had seen and experienced enough injustice and violence toward blacks that she was willing to challenge and defy decades of restrictive laws.

"I always said if I lived to get grown and had a chance," she said, "I was going to do something for the black man of the South if it would cost my life; I was determined to see that things were changed."

In "This Little Light of Mine: The Life of Fannie Lou Hamer," journalist Kay Mills has written an extensive, carefully documented biography of this remarkable woman, who became one of the heroines of the civil rights movement. The book briefly traces Hamer's humble beginnings and then focuses on her efforts until her death in 1977 to change a repressive system that controlled blacks politically, socially, and economically.

Mississippi remained the most stalwart state in the Deep South in its opposition to giving blacks equal rights. Blacks who tried to knock down the steel walls of white resistance there often lost their jobs, had their homes set on fire, were jailed and beaten, or lynched. Hamer experienced some of this treatment.

After she tried to register to vote, she was banned from her home on her boss's plantation and forced to live with relatives in another county. In the summer of 1963, she was jailed and brutally beaten by Mississippi police after she and other civil rights workers traveled home from a bus trip to South Carolina for voter-education training. Hamer's health never fully recovered from that beating.

Her account of this incident at the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, N.J., helped put her in the national spotlight. But even before she testified, Hamer had become an important figure in the civil rights struggle. Though she had only a sixth-grade education and her grammar was poor, her speaking and singing ability captivated people.

She had "the capacity to put together a mosaic of coherent thought about freedom and justice, so that when it was all through, you knew what you had heard because it held together with wonderful cohesion," remembers Eleanor Holmes Norton, the District of Columbia's delegate to Congress, who worked for the civil rights cause as a law student. …

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