New Trade Chiefs in EC and US Spark Hopes for GATT

By Howard LaFranchi, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 22, 1993 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

New Trade Chiefs in EC and US Spark Hopes for GATT


Howard LaFranchi, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


WITH the world economy continuing to lumber under a stubborn slowdown, international trade officials are hoping the arrival of new hands on the political controls in both Washington and Brussels will steer the Uruguay Round of international trade talks toward rapid conclusion.

Just this week Sir Leon Brittan, the European Community's new trade commissioner, said he would undertake beginning next week a series of high-level meetings - including, he hoped, talks with newly appointed United States trade representative Mickey Kantor - to break open the 108-nation trade negotiations.

"Every week we don't have an agreement costs the world dear in money and jobs," said Sir Leon in Brussels, the EC administrative headquarters.

Now all eyes are fixed on Washington to see what kind of initiatives will come out of the Clinton administration. "What people are looking for is this new blood - Brittan and Clinton and his people - to inject some renewed energy into this last stretch" of the talks, says one senior trade source close to the negotiations. "Right now the ball is in Washington's court; we're looking for signals."

The six-year-old Uruguay Round of negotiations, under the auspices of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), is designed to extend international trade rules to such new areas as agriculture, textiles, services, and intellectual property.

The round has repeatedly stalled over US-EC trade differences since high-level talks collapsed in December 1990 over agriculture. The US and EC finally reached agreement on the extremely sensitive farm chapter of the negotiations last November, but efforts to wrap up the round with the Bush administration failed.

Now some observers doubt further progress can be made before March elections in France, where the Socialist government attacked the US-EC farm accord as too favorable to the US. But March is also the date by which the talks would need to conclude in order to get an agreement passed by the US Congress before the administration's negotiating mandate runs out in June.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

New Trade Chiefs in EC and US Spark Hopes for GATT
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?