North Korea Raises Stakes in Nuclear-Inspection Game

By Clayton Jones, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, March 15, 1993 | Go to article overview

North Korea Raises Stakes in Nuclear-Inspection Game


Clayton Jones, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


IN a move seen as either a diplomatic bluff or a nuclear threat, North Korea has announced plans to pull out of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the first nation ever to do so.

The surprise action by a nation known for its past terrorism may force the issue of the North's nuclear program into the United Nations Security Council. The UN's options, however, are limited by the present economic isolation of the Pyongyang regime and the possibility that it already has a nuclear bomb, some analysts say.

On the other hand, since the NPT requires members to give three-months' notice before withdrawing, North Korea's move could be just a ploy to achieve a compromise in coming weeks from the International Atomic Energy Agency, the UN agency that overseas the treaty.

On Feb. 25, the Vienna-based IAEA demanded a "special" inspection of two suspect facilities within a month, after which it would refer the matter to the Security Council. The agency, relying on data from United States spy planes, estimates that the North may have produced large quantities of bomb-grade plutonium.

Rather than comply, the North on March 12 announced its withdrawal from the NPT, triggering renewed concern that it might be trying to hide a bomb program.

"If this is a ploy, it might work," says Paul Leventhal, head of the Nuclear Control Institute, a Washington-based private watchdog body. "It changes the subject from acceptance of inspections to whether North Korea stays in the NPT."

North Korean officials indicate they are still willing to deal with the IAEA, but first want it to stop using information from the US. The North claims the US made 190 reconnaissance flights over its territory in February alone.

Since last May, the IAEA has been allowed to make six ground inspections of sites chosen by North Korea. The "special" inspection was sought on a site specified by the IAEA.

Despite the possibility that the North's move is just a gambit, its action has raised tensions in Asia, where many nations fear Japan make seek atomic weapons if threatened by North Korea. Japanese officials last week backed up US reports that the North has 33 to 55 pounds of weapons-grade plutonium, at least twice the amount needed for one bomb. …

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