Strike in Eastern Germany Reveals Gap with West LAGGING PRODUCTIVITY

By Francine S. Kiefer, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 13, 1993 | Go to article overview

Strike in Eastern Germany Reveals Gap with West LAGGING PRODUCTIVITY


Francine S. Kiefer, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


THE strike among east Germany's metal, engineering, and steel workers is about much more than the demand for higher wages. It mirrors the debate that sprang from German reunification: Are east Germans second-class citizens economically compared with west Germans?

The strike raises the question as to whether east Germany can attract investors if wages there are much higher than elsewhere in Eastern Europe.

Workers began their strike last week, the first in over 60 years, to force the reinstatement of a contract bringing their wages up to parity with west German wages by 1994. The agreement, signed two years ago, called for wage increases of over 20 percent as of April 1 of this year. But employers reneged on the contract, saying the agreement had become unfeasible due to recession and other economic factors.

They instead offered pay increases of 9 percent this year, on par with the current east German rate of inflation. East Germans in these industries earn about 60 to 70 percent of what west Germans earn, though their productivity lags by as much as 70 percent.

Franz Steinkuhler, president of IG Metall, the powerful engineering union that organized the strike, argues that the east should not become a "cheap-wage colony" of the west. Workers east of the Elbe River deserve the same treatment as those in the west, he says.

But West German union members haven't shown a great deal of support for their colleagues in the east. Yesterday, as a sign of "solidarity" with their eastern colleagues, west German workers staged brief demonstrations - mostly during their lunch break. So far, they have not been willing to make any greater sacrifice to help their poorer cousins.

West Germans have something to gain at the moment from the demise of industry in the east. …

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