Lawmakers Urge Tougher Rules on Sale, Promotion of Tobacco Pending Health Reform Gives Tobacco Industry's Opponents Fresh Hope That Congress May Approve Legislation Altering How Companies Do Business

By Ron Scherer, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 18, 1993 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Lawmakers Urge Tougher Rules on Sale, Promotion of Tobacco Pending Health Reform Gives Tobacco Industry's Opponents Fresh Hope That Congress May Approve Legislation Altering How Companies Do Business


Ron Scherer, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


SHOULD tobacco be regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)?

If Rep. Mike Synar (D) of Oklahoma and Rep. Dick Durbin (D) of Ohio have their way, it will be.

Yesterday, Representatives Synar and Durbin introduced legislation that, if passed, would have a wide impact on the tobacco companies.

"It is very clear as we move forward to a national health-care bill and a new commitment to preventative medicine, the largest drain on our system is tobacco," Synar said in an interview.

According to health-care groups, some 400,000 people per year die because of smoking- related illness. In addition, Synar notes that smoking costs the economy about $65 billion a year in lost productivity and medical payments.

Although Synar has failed to convince Congress to approve similar legislation in the past, he says this time "I have a president and first lady who are committed to health-care reform and realize we have to deal with tobacco."

The bill itself is wide-ranging. "This law fundamentally changes the way the tobacco industry is allowed to do business," says Scott Ballin, a vice president of the American Heart Association. For example, the proposal would require the secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which administers the FDA, to promulgate rules governing the manufacture, distribution, sale, labeling, and advertising of the product.

Among the points of the proposed legislation:

* A federal minimum age of 18 years to purchase tobacco. Currently, 49 of 50 states have such a minimum age. However, antitobacco advocates point out the laws are not enforced since the average age when tobacco use begins is 13.

The new law would require the FDA to implement the regulations. For example, the FDA could ban vending machines if it determined underage youth routinely obtained cigarettes from such devices. All tobacco products would have to be marked, "Federal law prohibits sale to minors."

* The tobacco industry would be prohibited from giving out free samples or distributing discounted cigarettes as a result of coupons.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Lawmakers Urge Tougher Rules on Sale, Promotion of Tobacco Pending Health Reform Gives Tobacco Industry's Opponents Fresh Hope That Congress May Approve Legislation Altering How Companies Do Business
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?