An Actor of Many Parts Richard Chamberlain Talks about His Latest Role in `My Fair Lady'

By Keith Henderson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, July 1, 1993 | Go to article overview

An Actor of Many Parts Richard Chamberlain Talks about His Latest Role in `My Fair Lady'


Keith Henderson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


EARLY in his career, Richard Chamberlain recognized the benefits of trying all kinds of roles in all kinds of media. "I didn't want to be stuck in a rut," says the actor, who came perilously close to that during five years in the 1960s as television's "Dr. Kildare."

Since Kildare, Mr. Chamberlain has done Shakespeare, movies, and a string of acclaimed TV miniseries. He's again trying something different: playing Prof. Henry Higgins in a Broadway-bound revival of Lerner and Loewe's "My Fair Lady."

Musicals aren't new for Chamberlain. He has long had an interest in singing and once tried his hand at a musical rendition of "Breakfast at Tiffany's," starring with Mary Tyler Moore. It was a flop. Judging from the reviews and the response of audiences during its Boston run, "My Fair Lady" is likely to be Chamberlain's first musical triumph.

When the show's producers came looking for an American who could pull off the Higgins character, this leading man, usually associated with heroic roles that are anything but professorial and stuffy, was ready. "I love the complexity of Higgins, I love his journey," Chamberlain said during an interview in Boston. "It's so enlightening in terms of what men are going through now."

The professor's reluctant recognition that Eliza has to be accepted as his equal is one reason the time is right for a new production of "My Fair Lady," according to Chamberlain. It's "pertinent" to the rise of women into positions of authority in society and to the new relationships evolving as a result. Beyond that, he says, the show is "marvelous escapist fare, fun and dripping in romance." That kind of thing usually does well in uncertain economic times, he says.

Even so, the actor says "You have to resist the temptation to become a lovable musical comedy character - Higgins is much more than that." He recalls seeing a London production of George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion," on which "My Fair Lady" is based. That Higgins was not lovable at all. Chamberlain doesn't go that far, but he says he wants to emphasize the distance the professor had to go to be changed by his "creation," Eliza.

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An Actor of Many Parts Richard Chamberlain Talks about His Latest Role in `My Fair Lady'
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