Businesses Lend a Helping Hand to Budget-Strapped US Schools Firms like Burger King Contribute Funds, Even Strategic Planning Series: WORLD MEDIA EDUCATION. Part 3. in the Last of 3 Special Reports, Writers for the World Media Newspaper Network Peer into the Future of Education, Especially the Effects of Computers, and They Contrast the Ways in Which Two World Leaders - the US and Japan - Have Structured Their Systems of Learning. the Preceding Parts Appeared Sept. 8 and Sept. 15 (World Edition, Sept. 10-16 and Sept. 17-23). Second of 5 Articles Appearing Today

By Ron Scherer. Ron Scherer is a writer of The Christian Science Monitor. | The Christian Science Monitor, September 22, 1993 | Go to article overview

Businesses Lend a Helping Hand to Budget-Strapped US Schools Firms like Burger King Contribute Funds, Even Strategic Planning Series: WORLD MEDIA EDUCATION. Part 3. in the Last of 3 Special Reports, Writers for the World Media Newspaper Network Peer into the Future of Education, Especially the Effects of Computers, and They Contrast the Ways in Which Two World Leaders - the US and Japan - Have Structured Their Systems of Learning. the Preceding Parts Appeared Sept. 8 and Sept. 15 (World Edition, Sept. 10-16 and Sept. 17-23). Second of 5 Articles Appearing Today


Ron Scherer. Ron Scherer is a writer of The Christian Science Monitor., The Christian Science Monitor


MIRIAM MUNIZ used to cut classes. Kimberly Stoeckle and Adlai Allen just didn't go to school.

But last November the three teenagers started to get more personalized counseling and extra tutoring. Their parents made certain they didn't just sit around the house watching television. Now, Miriam is working on her resume and dreams of becoming an interpreter at the United Nations; Kimberly is hoping to become a beautician; and Adlai, who wants to become a professional athlete, is attending classes.

What's making the difference for these teens? Corporate involvement.

Last November, Burger King Corporation contributed $65,000 to set up a "Burger King Academy" at William Penn High School here to reach teens who were at risk of dropping out. The teens, their parents, and the academy all signed contracts detailing what they agreed to accomplish.

After the first year, the local Burger King franchisee agreed to raise the money to keep the program going. The funds go toward such purposes as computer programs, counseling, tutors, and extra teachers.

Such corporate involvement in education is growing. "We are seeing more and more companies wanting to become directly involved in the schools," says Sean Milliken, special assistant to the vice president of program development at Cities in Schools Inc., a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit organization that set up the program used by Burger King.

In its annual survey of corporations, the Council for Aid to Education in New York estimates that United States corporations gave all educational institutions a total of $2.43 billion in 1991, up 4 percent from the previous year. While most of that funding went to higher education, the 410 companies that answered the survey said they gave about $316 million to elementary and secondary schools. Those numbers do not reflect the value of mentoring, tutoring, or the use of facilities provided by companies.

For example, Proctor & Gamble has become deeply involved in federal, state, and local educational strategy. Bob Wehling, vice president for public affairs, estimates that he spends 20 hours a week on education, and John Pepper, the consumer giant's president, spends 10 hours a week.

"The more people who are involved in-depth, including business people, the sooner we will solve the problem," says Mr. Wehling, who serves on an educational task force interacting with each of the 50 states.

The corporate effort is partly altruistic. But increasingly the effort is also for corporate self-preservation. "A company committed to living in one city cannot stand a city that is filled with dangerous young people," says Paul Hill, a senior social scientist at the RAND Corporation in Washington, D.C. He says corporations bring an atmosphere of "crisis and discontent," which causes cities to look more closely at their educational failures.

As some corporations are finding, however, making a difference in education can be as difficult as solving tough business problems. For years, the business community has tried to help schools with trips to the zoo or the purchase of video equipment.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Businesses Lend a Helping Hand to Budget-Strapped US Schools Firms like Burger King Contribute Funds, Even Strategic Planning Series: WORLD MEDIA EDUCATION. Part 3. in the Last of 3 Special Reports, Writers for the World Media Newspaper Network Peer into the Future of Education, Especially the Effects of Computers, and They Contrast the Ways in Which Two World Leaders - the US and Japan - Have Structured Their Systems of Learning. the Preceding Parts Appeared Sept. 8 and Sept. 15 (World Edition, Sept. 10-16 and Sept. 17-23). Second of 5 Articles Appearing Today
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.